Displaying items by tag: climate change

Talkin' Pets News

July 3, 2021

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jasmine the Dog Trainer - Tampa Bay, FL

Producer - Lexi Adams

Network Producer - Kevin Lane

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Bob Bryant - Co-Founder of Mission K9 Rescue - Serving Working Dogs Around The World - Bob will join Jon & Talkin' Pets at 5pm ET

Chef Jamie Gwen from her national radio program Food & Wine with Chef Jamie Gwen will join Jon & Talkin' Pets at 635pm ET to bake a Vegan Flag Cake

Talkin' Pets News May 1, 2021 Host - Jon Patch Co-Host - Jasmine the Dog Trainer - Tampa Bay, Florida Producer - Kayla Cavanaugh Network Producer - Darian Sims Social Media - Bob Page
Earth Day 2021: Passing On a Cleaner World No matter where you stand on the climate change debate, we all want clean air and water. Just in time for Earth Day on April 22, Bill Pekny shares five ways to fight pollution everyone can get behind. Midway, UT (April 2021)—Preserving the beauty and wonder of our natural world for future generations should certainly be a goal everyone can get behind. While progress is often stymied by polarizing debates, clean air and water should be a priority for everyone. “We all want to pass on a clean and healthy world,” says Bill Pekny author of A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary (Two Climates LLC, 2020, ISBN: 978-1-73493-960-6, $34.59). “But the science is confusing to the average person, and it can be easy to get lost in the details. Meanwhile, instead of focusing on the fruit closest to the ground we waste our energy trying to convince ‘the other side’ to see things our way.” Pekny, who holds M.S. and B.S. degrees from Georgia Tech and DePaul and spent more than 50 years as a scientist in the U.S. Armed Forces and aerospace industry, wants to help demystify the science and help people understand what they can do to help. He says we should focus on combatting pollution in meaningful ways that are right in front of us instead of getting lost in debate that often just produces gridlock. “Small, incremental changes can get us moving toward bigger changes in the future,” he says. “People will start seeing the benefits right away. These little victories can generate some real momentum and get people excited about working toward a cleaner world.” With that in mind, here are five ways to fight pollution that we can all get behind. Pekny offers these ideas that could pack a big punch in our quest for clean air and water. Focus our efforts on pollution mitigation. All too often we get caught up on reducing carbon emissions in the abstract, and it can distract from other more meaningful ways to fight air pollution. Plus, getting rid of CO2 won’t help reduce other toxic pollutants. Manage forests better to minimize wildfires and resultant smoke (PM2.5) pollution. This includes controlled burns, managed logging operations, and preemptive thinning and removal of underbrush that fuel wildfires. This is a wise step, since trees usually leave the forest in only two ways—lumber or smoke! Place more emphasis on walking trails, biking trails, car-pooling, and public transportation in order to reduce vehicle pollutant emissions. Build more firebreak and logging roads. These roads improve accessibility to fire prone areas and gives us greater ability to inspect remote power lines (a frequent source of wildfires). Fund life cycle research and development of safe modular nuclear reactors and the geothermal fracking process. These have the potential to be flexible, reliable, and continuous sources of clean energy. “The natural beauty of our planet is incredible,” says Pekny. “My hope is that everyone will gain and enjoy a greater understanding of how we can work together to preserve this natural beauty for future generations.” # # # About the Author: Bill Pekny is the author of A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary. He holds physics M.S. and B.S. degrees from Georgia Tech and DePaul University, plus graduate study in physical meteorology and numerical analysis at Florida State University and the University of Utah, and a visiting scholar appointment at the Ginzton Laboratory of Applied Physics at Stanford University. Bill’s career in science spans over 50 years in the U.S. Armed Forces and the aerospace industry. His career highlights include: Project Stormfury with the U.S. Navy Hurricane Hunters; applied atmospheric physics and meteorology research; LASER RADAR development; new product testing in various atmospheric environments; aviation optics and electronics; global climate research; and more. About the Book: A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary (Two Climates LLC, 2020, ISBN: 978-1-73493-960-6, $34.59) is available from major online booksellers.

Talkin' Pets News

January 30, 2021

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Karen Vance - Dog Trainer - Tampa, FL

Producer - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guest - Top Vet, Marty Greer, Pens 'YOUR PANDEMIC PUPPY', Essential Guide to Dog Ownership in Exceptional Times-Chapters include "Keeping Your Pooch Happy in the Age of Covid" - she joins Talkin' Pets at 6pm ET on 1/30/21

Talkin' Pets News

December 12, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Anne Lampru - Animal Alternatives

Producer - Matt Matera

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests -Tavor White, Chew Executive Officer of Chews Happiness will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 12/12/20 at 530pm ET to discuss and give away his delicious and healthy Barkaron dog treats

Noelle Almrud, Director of the Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch will join Jon & Talkin' pets 12/12/20 at 630pm ET to discuss the 12 days of Equine Christmas

Talkin' Pets News

October 17, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Jasmine the Dog Trainer - Tampa Bay, FL

Producer - Devin Leech

Network Producer - Darian Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests - Jocelyn Kessler of Being-Animal will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/17/20 at 5pm ET to discuss her mission and challenge to redefine the relationship between animals and humans

Dan Schachner - Pet Advocate and Puppy Bowl 'Ruff"-eree to discuss creating awareness for Adoption this National Make A Dog's Day presented by Subaru

Talkin' Pets News

July 25, 2020

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Anne Lampru - Animal Alternatives

Producer - Kayla Cavanaugh

Network Producerr - Darian Sims

Consultant Social Media - Bob Page

Special Guests -Carol Kaufmann author of "97 Ways to Make a Cat Like You" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 7/25/20 at 5pm ET to discuss & give away her new book

Dr. Mike Heithaus, Marine Ecologist, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 7/25/20 at 630pm ET to discuss this year's Sharkfest and his role in Sharkcano and Raging Bull Shark

(Washington, D.C., May 11, 2020) When the New York State Legislature finalized the state budget, it included the Accelerated Renewable Energy Growth and Community Benefit Act. The Act seeks to streamline the approval process for wind and solar energy projects as part of the State’s approach to achieving its renewable energy goals. While it does have some positive elements for wildlife, such as seeking to site projects on degraded lands and creating a bird impact mitigation fund, the Act also fast-tracks facets of renewable energy planning and development, and changes in this process raise red flags with some conservation groups.

“We have concerns about how this will be implemented,” says Joel Merriman, ABC’s Bird-Smart Wind Energy Campaign Director. “A combination of aggressive timelines and the potential for automatic approvals at key steps in the process leaves the door open for wind energy facility plans to inadequately address risks to birds.”

Wind energy development is an important element of fighting climate change, but it does not come without environmental costs. ABC estimates that more than 500,000 birds are killed annually from collisions with wind turbines in the U.S. Given projected industry build-out, that figure is expected to increase to more than 1.4 million annually by 2030. Birds are also killed by powerlines installed to connect wind facilities to the energy grid, and yet others are displaced by facility development. Some species, such as Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles, are more vulnerable to turbine collisions, and due to slow reproductive rates, these birds have less capacity to recover from losses.

The Act creates a new Office of Renewable Energy Siting, which will work with other agencies to review and set conditions for proposed renewable energy projects. The input of wildlife management agencies will be crucial to ensure that birds receive adequate protection, but under the new law, these agencies are given short time windows to participate. Insufficient staffing, busy seasons, and many other factors could prevent meaningful review and input, potentially leaving birds largely out of the discussion.

Further, under the new law, local community input is substantially reduced and comes later in the planning process. This may prevent those with first-hand knowledge of local bird populations from influencing critical project elements that are determined early in the process, including facility and turbine siting.  

“A lot hinges on development of strong standards and conditions for project siting and planning,” says Merriman. “These must ensure that local bird populations are thoroughly assessed, and that turbines are not sited in high-risk areas.”

For example, in an application filed for the Heritage Wind project in western New York in mid-March, the developer proposes placing wind turbines in close proximity to a large wetland complex that includes a National Wildlife Refuge and two state Wildlife Management Areas. Important to both breeding and migratory birds, this block of habitat supports many species of conservation concern and is also considered an Important Bird Area. During the planning process, two local bird conservation organizations raised concerns about the planned facility’s proximity to these sensitive areas, but these points have not been addressed by the developer.

“The bird-related conflict that poorly sited wind facilities create is largely avoidable if good siting practices are required,” says Merriman. “The State can greatly reduce this kind of conflict by establishing no-go zones and other commonsense standards to keep turbines out of high-risk areas.”

Merriman offers some broader advice on meeting renewable energy goals: “Renewable energy development is just one piece of the climate change solution puzzle,” he says. “We encourage the State to be equally aggressive in implementing energy efficiency measures and installing distributed solar energy. Put solar panels on commercial, municipal, and residential buildings, over parking lots…anywhere they can be supported. Birds and people win when energy production is sited where it’s used, away from valuable bird habitat.”

Merriman continues, “In other arenas, New York has done great things for birds. The State can maintain this commitment by making some adjustments to the Act, such as eliminating automatic approvals and setting a positive precedent in the development of standards and conditions for wind energy projects. A recent study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, ABC, and others shows that the United States and Canada lost nearly 3 billion birds — almost 30 percent of the total population — since 1970. It’s critical that we balance the need for renewable energy development with protecting our vulnerable bird populations.”

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American Bird Conservancy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation. Find us on abcbirds.orgFacebookInstagram, and Twitter (@ABCbirds).

Talkin' Pets News

December 7, 2019

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Maria Ryan - DogGone Positive

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Darien Sims

Social Media - Bob Page

On the Backs of Tortoises
Darwin, the Galápagos, and the Fate of an Evolutionary Eden
 
Elizabeth Hennessy
 
An insightful exploration of the iconic Galápagos tortoises, and how their fate is inextricably linked to our own in a rapidly changing world
 
The Galápagos archipelago is often viewed as a last foothold of pristine nature. For sixty years, conservationists have worked to restore this evolutionary Eden after centuries of exploitation at the hands of pirates, whalers, and island settlers. Elizabeth Hennessy’s book tells the story of the islands’ namesakes—the giant tortoises—as coveted food sources, objects of natural history, and famous icons of conservation and tourism. By doing so, it brings into stark relief the paradoxical, and impossible, goal of conserving species by trying to restore a past state of prehistoric evolution. The tortoises, Hennessy demonstrates, are not prehistoric, but rather microcosms whose stories show how deeply human and nonhuman life are entangled. Acknowledging the interlocked relationship between evolution and global history, Hennessy puts forward a vision for conservation based on reckoning with the past, rather than trying to erase it.
 
About the Author
ELIZABETH HENNESSY is assistant professor of history and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin‑Madison, where she is on the steering committee of the Center for Culture, History, and Environment (CHE) and—building on her background in journalism and editing—serves as faculty advisor for CHE’s graduate‑student‑run digital magazine, Edge Effects. She received her Ph.D. in geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In Ecuador, she works with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and its Galápagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences.                                                                                                                                                                                                     More . . .
 
Advance Praise for On the Backs of Tortoises
 
“Wonderfully interesting, informative, and engaging, as well as scholarly.”—Janet Browne, author of Charles Darwin: Voyaging and Charles Darwin: The Power of Place
 
“Timely, fresh, and compelling . . . a must read for anyone interested in the environmental history of the Galapagos and tortoise conservation.”—Jamie Lorimer, University of Oxford, author of Wildlife in the Anthropocene:  Conservation after Nature
 
“Hennessy’s book isn’t just about the controversial efforts to preserve the world’s most famous tortoises—it also provides an expansive tour de force of Darwinian ideas, the Galapagos, human entanglements in evolution, and the risks of icon making.”—Daniel Lewis, author of Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai‘i
 
“Hennessy’s enthralling history of the iconic Galápagos Islands focuses on the tortoises after which they are named to deftly unpack the contradictions of global conservation in the name of science.”—Claudia Leal, author of Landscapes of Freedom: Building a Postemancipation Society in the Rainforests of Western Colombia
 
“Hennessey finds that even though this archipelago is 97% a national park, humans can no longer consider themselves distinct from nature, but rather are an inseparable part of it with consequences for the identity of each.”—Deborah Cramer, author of The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey
 
 
 
* * * * * * *
 
Title: On the Backs of Tortoises: Darwin, the Galápagos, and the Fate of an Evolutionary Eden 
Author: Elizabeth Hennessy
Price: $30.00 * ISBN: 978‑0‑300‑23274‑5 Hardcover * eBook ISBN: 978‑0‑300‑24915‑6
Pages: 336 * 20 b/w illus.
Publication Date: October 29, 2019
 
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