Displaying items by tag: rescue

Bat World Sanctuary and Its President Amanda Lollar Awarded $6.1 Million in Defamation Lawsuit Against Mary Cummins FORT WORTH, Texas, June 15, 2012 -- Bat World Sanctuary, an international non-profit organization devoted to rescuing and rehabilitating bats, and its president, Amanda Lollar of Mineral Wells, were awarded $6.1 million in damages by a Tarrant County district judge yesterday in a defamation lawsuit. After a four-day trial the court found that Mary Cummins of Los Angeles, California had committed defamation against Amanda Lollar and had breached her internship contract with Bat World Sanctuary. In 2010 Mary Cummins was accepted for an internship at Bat World Sanctuary in Mineral Wells. While at Bat World she became dissatisfied with the program and left the internship early. According to the plaintiffs she went back to California and began posting "horrific allegations of animal cruelty against Amanda Lollar on the internet." She accused Amanda Lollar of performing "illegal surgeries" on bats without anesthesia, possessing and distributing controlled substances without a DEA license, throwing dead bats in the trash, allowing interns to be repeatedly bitten by rabid bats, breeding bats illegally, giving human rabies vaccinations to interns, and neglecting her pet dogs. She filed reports of animal cruelty with numerous wildlife and conservation organizations as well as humane and animal welfare organizations. She also complained to a foundation that had been providing funding to Bat World but stopped doing so after receiving Cummins' complaint. She filed complaints with the Texas Department of Health, the Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the Texas Attorney General, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the USDA, the Mineral Wells Police and Fire Department, the Palo Pinto District Attorney and other agencies. Every agency that investigated Bat World Sanctuary found Cummins' complaints to be completely without merit. According to Eric Shupps, the plaintiff's expert on information technology, Cummins used "search engine optimization" and "Google bombs" to spread her defamation far and wide across the internet. Judge William Brigham, who was the visiting judge in the 352nd District Court of Tarrant County, announced at the conclusion of the trial that Amanda Lollar is world-renowned and is to bats what Jane Goodall is to primates. He said that Mary Cummins' defamation of Amanda Lollar was "intentional, malicious, and egregious" and ordered her to pay $3.0 million in compensatory damages and $3.0 million in punitive damages. He also ordered her to pay $10,000 for breach of her contract with Bat World and $176,700 in attorney's fees. Lollar's attorney, Randy Turner with the firm Bailey & Galyen said, "This judgment sends a powerful message to cyber-stalkers and others who use the internet to harass people or to harm their reputations. Innocent victims like Amanda Lollar often don't have the resources, expertise, or ability to defend themselves against such vicious internet attacks. Hopefully this judgment will make someone think twice before engaging in an internet smear campaign." With determination, strong will, and the help of an attorney who has never lost an animal rights case, Ms. Lollar has won the fight and can now get on with what she does best - helping bats. "I would like to thank everyone who stood by us during this ordeal and never, ever lost faith in us. Mr. Turner and his paralegal, Kelly Bozeman, worked tirelessly for us and we couldn't have won without them. I will be forever grateful," said Ms. Lollar. About Bat World Sanctuary Ms. Lollar, who has authored both scientific and popular literature, plans to write a book about her personal nightmare regarding this case. She hopes to bring about changes in the legal system regarding internet harassment, because in most states there are no laws that protect the victims. This type of crime is on the rise and she would like to bring it to the forefront. Proceeds from the sale of the book will benefit Bat World Sanctuary. Bat World Sanctuary is a non-profit organization founded by Amanda Lollar. Bat World is accredited by the American Sanctuary Association and verified by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. Learn more about Ms. Lollar by visiting www.BatWorld.org. Contact: Amanda Lollar, President & Founder www.BatWorld.org This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Facebook.com/BatWorld Twitter - @batworld  # # #

Pit bulls have gained 11 pounds each since rescue

NEW YORK—Humane Law Enforcement (HLE) agents of the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) arrested Bronx resident Gillian Irving on Friday, April 20 for allegedly neglecting and starving her two seven-month-old pit bulls, named Cagney and Lacey.

On February 17, 2012, HLE agents responded to a complaint of two skinny and neglected canines inside an apartment on Webster Avenue in the Norwood section of the Bronx. Agents encountered the dogs and both appeared to be neglected. Ms. Irving relinquished Cagney and Lacey to the agents, and they were transported to the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital for treatment.

ASPCA veterinarians determined that Cagney and Lacey had been starved—they weighed 16.4 and 15.2 pounds, respectively, upon intake. After receiving treatment by ASPCA staff, Cagney now weighs 27.1 pounds and Lacey weighs 26.9 pounds—a 65 and 77 percent increase, respectively. Both dogs are recovering at the hospital and will eventually be made available for adoption.

Irving, 27, was arrested by ASPCA Special Agent Ann Kelly. She was charged with two counts of misdemeanor animal cruelty. If convicted, she faces up to two years in jail and/or a $2,000 fine. Irving is due in Bronx Criminal Court on August 22.

To report animal cruelty in New York City, contact the ASPCA’s Humane Law Enforcement department at (212) 876-7700, ext. 4450 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Photo Caption: Cagney, before and after receiving treatment at the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital

 

Photo Caption: Lacey, before and after receiving treatment at the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital


About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. One million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org.

To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/aspca.

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Dear Jon,

Thank you for having me on the Talkin’ Pets show yesterday! Your show is energetic, fun, interesting, informative… Thank you also for the introduction and for the frequent mentions of my book – I very much appreciate your kindness and generosity.
Talkin' Pets provides an excellent service to the community at large and for the animals who inhabit it with us. I wish you every success.
Regards,

Marie Mead
Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits - Inspirational Stories of Rescue, Triumph, and Joy

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Various agencies collaborate to place current shelter population
with rescue groups throughout region

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), through its Shelter Response Partnership program, is transporting more than 30 dogs from the Humane Society of Henderson County in Henderson, Ky., to several shelters and rescue groups throughout the region. Officials at the local shelter requested the ASPCA’s assistance in the transfer and placement of the current shelter population to enable them to house animals that were seized during a recent criminal investigation and allow the dogs a chance for adoption at other shelters through the transport operation.

The ASPCA Shelter Response Partnership program is a network of national and local animal welfare organizations that assists the ASPCA Field Investigations and Response team by providing a second chance for animals rescued from overcrowded facilities and cruelty investigations.

“The ASPCA is grateful for our response partners who stepped up to help a shelter with limited resources and offer to help transfer and place the animals in permanent homes,” said Joel Lopez, senior manager of operations for ASPCA Field Investigations and Response. “The transport and placement plan will allow the Humane Society of Henderson County to continue its daily operations without overcrowding its facility.”

The dogs—which include a variety of different breeds such as Labrador, shepherd, boxer and hound mixes—were medically examined and behaviorally evaluated by ASPCA responders in the past week. Dr. Pamela Reid, vice president of the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Behavior team, reported that the majority of the dogs were very friendly and will make great companions for individuals and families looking to add a four-legged member to their home.

“The ASPCA stepped in to ensure that the recent string of criminal court cases and seizures did not overpopulate our shelter, putting adoptable animals at risk,” said Joshua Cromer, shelter director of the Humane Society of Henderson County. “We are grateful that the ASPCA provided resources to help in the placement of our animals, and I’m confident that they will be placed into loving homes. We will be able to continue to do our work in speaking up and protecting homeless, neglected and abused animals that don't have a voice in our community.”

The ASPCA animal transport trailer, a custom-built 60-foot-long vehicle, will be making several stops during the transfer operation. Agencies assisting the ASPCA with placement include: Kentucky Humane Society (Louisville, Ky.); Capital Area Humane Society (Hilliard, Ohio); and SPCA Cincinnati (Cincinnati, Ohio).

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. More than one million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org.

To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to www.twitter.com/aspca.

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with Assistance from IFAW & PetSmart Charities

ASPCA manages forensic evidence collection & removal of animals
to support Garland County Sheriff’s Office animal cruelty investigation in Hot Springs, Ark.

NEW YORK—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), at the request of the Garland County Sheriff’s Office, is managing the evidence collection and sheltering of more than 100 dogs living in a substandard commercial breeding facility—commonly known as a puppy mill—in Hot Springs, Ark., approximately 55 miles southwest of Little Rock. The operation is being supported by responders from the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), PetSmart Charities, Inc. and Garland County Humane Society.

A search warrant was executed Monday morning for the removal of the dogs, and the animals are being transported to a nearby emergency shelter where they will receive medical care and treatment. The ASPCA is also collecting evidence for the investigation as well as lending the services of its veterinary forensics teams, led by Dr. Rhonda Windham, medical director of the ASPCA’s Field Investigations and Response team. The owner of the puppy mill facility, Pam Thomas, has been arrested and charged with three counts of felony animal cruelty.

“The ASPCA has been invaluable in the coordination, investigation, processing and forensic evidence collection of the endangered and mistreated animals,” said Lieutenant James Martin of the Garland County Sheriff’s Office. “The successful completion of this operation would not have taken place without their experience, resources and expertise, as the magnitude of this operation is beyond the capabilities of Garland County resources.”

“The ASPCA is pleased to be in a position to lend our assistance and help the Garland County Sheriff’s Office put an end to abusive puppy mills in their community,” said Kathryn Destreza, director of Investigations for the ASPCA’s Field Investigations and Response team. “Puppy mill dogs suffer from living in extremely unsanitary conditions, without adequate veterinary care, food, water and socialization, and we appreciate the efforts of the local authorities in pursuing this investigation. Our goal is to help the local authorities by providing experts and resources to support the case, and see that these animals move on to a better place.”

Garland County Sheriff’s Investigator, Cpl. Angela Graybeal, began a criminal investigation in 2009 after allegations of health issues and charges had been brought against Ms. Thomas, owner of the Happy Times Kennel at 210 Barbershop Drive, also known as Rainbow Kennel and Spa City Pets, for violation of the Rabies Control Act.

During the two year investigation, Investigator Graybeal received numerous complaints regarding the living conditions, medical issues and mistreatment of more than 100 animals housed on the property. The Garland County Sheriff’s Office was able to determine that Thomas was operating a puppy mill through undercover visits and purchases, with support from the Garland County Humane Society, which connected investigators with the ASPCA for assistance.

The dogs—mainly small breeds such as Chihuahuas, West Highland white terriers, Boston terriers and dachshunds—were discovered living in feces-encrusted pens and deplorable conditions on the property. Many of the dogs exhibited various signs of neglect and appear to have severe skin problems and flea infestation, among other medical conditions.

The ASPCA is assessing and treating each animal by utilizing its fully equipped Northeast “Mobile Animal Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) Unit,” a specially-designed vehicle outfitted with state-of-the-art forensics tools and medical equipment tailored for animal patients. Additionally, the ASPCA’s custom-built animal transport trailer is also being utilized to help transfer animals to the emergency shelter.

More than 30 responders are on the scene, including staff and volunteers from IFAW, which is providing sheltering services and assisting with evidence collection; PetSmart Charities, which is providing much-needed supplies and helping set up the emergency shelter; and volunteers from the Garland County Humane Society, who will be assisting with the daily care of the animals housed at the temporary shelter.

“Upon learning of the deplorable conditions these animals were subjected to, IFAW took immediate action to help protect them from further suffering,” said Shannon Walajtys, IFAW Emergency Relief officer. “IFAW works around the world to ensure that dogs live in healthy conditions and we are dismayed to encounter, yet again, such appalling conditions here in the U.S.”

“Our Emergency Relief Waggin’ program offers assistance to animal victims, like these dogs, who need immediate care and attention,” added Susana Della Maddalena, executive director of PetSmart Charities. “Some of these dogs will experience, for the first time, what it’s like to be well fed, clean and comfortable. Our hope is that the pets rescued from cruelty cases, low-quality breeders and hoarders can be rehabilitated and placed into the caring homes they deserve.”

Tim Rickey, senior director of ASPCA Field Investigations and Response added, “With the support and collaboration of these agencies, the ASPCA is able to continue its life-saving work in the field. We truly appreciate our partnership with these national animal welfare groups to rescue animals like these from inhumane conditions.”

The ASPCA Field Investigations and Response team has rescued countless dogs from puppy mills across the nation and aided in the prosecution of their owners. Furthermore, the ASPCA’s Government Relations department has been active in drafting and promoting legislation that would strengthen regulations and raise minimum standards of care for dogs in puppy mills, most recently in Texas and Pennsylvania. Additionally, the ASPCA launched a national “No Pet Store Puppies” campaign, which seeks to raise awareness about the connection between puppy mills and pet stores.

For more information about puppy mills and how to fight animal cruelty, visit www.nopetstorepuppies.com.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first humane organization established in the Americas and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animal welfare. One million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. The ASPCA, which is headquartered in New York City, offers a wide range of programs, including a mobile clinic outreach initiative, its own humane law enforcement team, and a groundbreaking veterinary forensics team and mobile animal CSI unit. For more information, please visit www.aspca.org. To become a fan of the ASPCA on Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com/aspca. To follow the ASPCA on Twitter, go to http://www.twitter.com/aspca.

About IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare)
Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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On September 17 Pilots N Paws, with much needed support from Petmate, will
relocate at least 200 animals from South Carolina to their new forever homes in
Washington D.C., Florida, New Jersey and Georgia. This Memorial Rescue Flight is
dedicated to the “Chesterfield 22”—twenty-two dogs that were needlessly shot to
death in Chesterfield, South Carolina in March.

Since 2009, Petmate has been proud to partner with Pilots N Paws, a program that
gives dogs a second chance one flight at a time. This unique program brings
together planes, pilots and shelters to rescue and transport dogs (and other
animals) from overcrowded shelters, relocating them to organizations committed
to finding them homes.

“Safe transportation is a life and death matter for all pets,” says Petmate CEO
Joe Messner. “And even more so for these rescued animals, whose lives truly
depend on this transportation. We feel a responsibility to help animals in need
and want to make this most important journey safe and comfortable.”

Of the thousands of rescue flights Pilots N Paws has made since its inception,
the 3rd Annual Awareness Event is an acute reminder of why Pilots N Paws exists.
In March of this year, Deborah Farhi, a volunteer with the Chesterfield County
Animal Shelter in South Carolina, noticed many of the dogs in the shelter were
missing. Upon questioning, shelter volunteers accused four local animal control
officers of shooting at least 22 of the dogs in their care to death instead of
euthanizing them through the approved, humane methods.

Shortly thereafter, Farhi began uncovering these dogs from a shallow landfill
across the street from the shelter. Sheriff Sam Parker, who oversees animal
control, put all four officers on leave, and within weeks the state attorney
general asked the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division to begin investigating
the allegations. Today, the case against Chesterfield County is still under
investigation.

To honor the (at least) 22 animals that lost their lives in March, this year’s
awareness event will bring together 45 pilots and their planes in an effort to
save at least 200 dogs from seven different counties throughout South Carolina
on September 17. Additionally, hundreds of other pilots across the country will
fly rescue animals the same weekend as part of the event. Petmate will support
this amazing event by donating all of the kennels, collars, leashes and
seatbelts that the pilots need to ensure safe transport of the animals.

The rescue flights will start on Saturday, September 17 at 6:30 a.m. at the
Florence Regional Airport in South Carolina (www.florencescairport.com).  In the
event of inclement weather, the flights will be postponed until Sunday,
September 18.

Petmate also donated supplies to last year’s 2nd annual awareness event, which
was held on September 18, 2010, in New Orleans. Hundreds of volunteers—both
pilots and rescues—came together to change the lives of 171 animals.  With 22
planes on the ground at the New Orleans Lakefront airport, many adoptable dogs
were successfully sent on their way to find a new family to love.

For more information about the Pilots N Paws Memorial Rescue Flights for “The
Chesterfield 22”, please visit www.pilotsnpaws.org.

About Pilots N Paws
Since the program began in February 2008, pilots have donated their time, planes
and fuel to fly thousands of dogs from shelters where they faced almost certain
death. Some areas of the country are more likely to have overcrowded shelters
and limited adoption opportunities. At www.pilotsnpaws.org, pilots can learn
about animals in need and work directly with shelters and rescue groups to
coordinate transportation. Nearly 7,500 shelters and rescues, along with 2,201
volunteer pilots are registered on the site.

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