FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

Date:     September 11, 2017                                    

Feline Fix by Five Leads Efforts to Reduce Cat Overpopulation in U.S.

Incorporating the veterinary practice of spaying and neutering cats by five months of age will reduce the numbers of unexpected litters of kittens. At no extra cost to the owner, this one small step is a significant change in the current veterinary approach to feline spay/neuter and a revolutionary step towards reducing cat overpopulation in the U. S.

The goal of the newly created Feline Fix by Five Team is to work closely with the veterinary community to take this message to cat parents and make it a common practice for them to Fix Felines by Five Months or less. Esther Mechler President of Marian’s Dream, the organization which is sponsoring the Feline Fix by Five Initiative, said, “All these years, there has never been this kind of shift in the practice of spay/neuter which resulted in cats ending up in shelters. We now have a problem which we can solve and it will not cost the owners any additional money.”

While there has been some progress in curbing the extensive domestic cat overpopulation, there’s still a lot of work that needs to be done. It is estimated that over four million cats each year are euthanized in shelters across the United States. In addition, approximately 70 % of all cats who enter the shelter system are euthanized. While over 80% of household cats are eventually spay/neutered, many have already had at least one prior litter.

In his book Replacing Myth with Math: Using Evidence-Based Programs to Eradicate Shelter Overpopulation (Concord, N.H.: Town & Country Reprographics, 2010), Peter Marsh, founder of the group Solutions to Overpopulation of Pets, reports that intact cats result in less than 15% of all kittens ending up in shelters. The other 85% comes from young cats that are having kittens. Altering cats by five months of age, rather than at the commonly accepted practice of six months, which has no scientific basis, will decrease the risk of unwanted litters by ensuring that kittens will not have that accidental first litter before they are spayed.  A 2015 Catalyst Council Report cites an American Humane Association Retention Study which states that 41 % of cat owners that adopt their cats from friends, family or a neighbor. These new owners typically have no idea their newly adopted feline can go into her first heat by five-months.

Educating cat parents as to the right time to spay/neuter will lead to having fewer cats who produce litters of kittens that would eventually be surrendered to shelters. Through outreach and education initiatives and partnering with veterinary community to get the word out, Feline Fix by Five is committed to ending the tidal wave of newborn kittens who enter shelters every spring and fall only to be euthanized, reducing cat overpopulation, and elevating the status of cats to the place they deserve. For more information about Feline Fix by Five, visit www.felinefixbyfive.org  

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BETHESDA, Md., USA – Oct. 13, 2017 – Alley Cat Allies will celebrate the international premiere of Global Cat Day on Oct. 16, 2017, as a day for people around the world to stand up for policies that protect all cats in their communities. Participants are signing a pledge on GlobalCatDay.org to support advocacy efforts for all cats, including the cats who call the outdoors their home.

With the campaign already racing toward a goal of 100,000 people taking the pledge by year’s end, Alley Cat Allies president and founder Becky Robinson explained that the lasting impact of Global Cat Day will be a powerful message about protecting cats who live outside.

“Too often, local policies lead to cats being taken from the only home they’ve ever known – the outdoors,” Robinson said. “Community cats are no different from raccoons, otters or deer in that they are self-reliant animals who are totally comfortable outside with no need for human companionship. Global Cat Day is a turning point in helping more people to understand these essential facts about the cats living outside in their communities.”

GlobalCatDay.org includes short videos explaining the nature of community cats, plus the Global Cat Day pledge:

“I pledge to be an ally to cats, including those who call the outdoors their home. I will advocate for compassionate policies that protect every cat in my community.”

Global Cat Day has evolved from National Feral Cat Day®, which Alley Cat Allies created on its 10th anniversary in 2001 to raise awareness about community cats, promote Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), and recognize the millions of compassionate Americans who care for them. Because compassion knows no borders, international participation in National Feral Cat Day grew each year, reaching at least 20 countries with last year’s edition. That mark has already been eclipsed this year, with engagement for the inaugural Global Cat Day coming from more than 40 countries, from Australia to the United Kingdom, Belgium to Brazil, Saudi Arabia to South Africa and many more.

“It’s very exciting that interest in advocating for outdoor cats is coming from so many corners of the globe, because it’s more evidence that this is now truly an international movement,” Robinson added.

Follow all the excitement for Global Cat Day on social media with the #GlobalCatDay hashtag.

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About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.


“America Loves Pets” Study Finds Most Talked-About Pets on Social Media 
To learn more about the relationship between Americans and their pets, TrustedHousesitters analyzed a year’s worth of social media conversation, including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram (March 2016-March 2017) to identify the most popular pets in each state. Visit the interactive graph to learn which pets are most popular in your state. Key findings include: 
- Californians talk the most about pets on social media
- Dogs hanging out with donkeys, cats nuzzling up with hamsters, budgies perching on the house rabbit and other harmonious pairings received more than 124,000 mentions  
-  The hashtag #crazycatlady has been used nearly 3.5 million times worldwide on Instagram
-  The most popular pet across the United States is the bulldog. However, most popular varied by states—in California and Texas, the most popular pet is the chihuahua; in Maine and South Carolina, it’s the Labrador; in Alaska and Ohio, it’s the husky
-  Nevada’s most popular pet: lizards
-  Cats are the second most talked-about pet in nearly every state, with Persians most popular overall (though, in Maine, the Maine coon is tops) 
 
About TrustedHousesitters.com 
TrustedHousesitters is a global community of pet lovers helping each other travel the world by connecting pet owners with a network of verified pet sitters. Since its 2011 launch in the U.K., TrustedHousesitters has grown into the world’s largest house sitting business, facilitating over two million nights of house and pet sitting globally and saving its members an estimated $218 million in accommodation and pet care costs. The site’s community of nearly half a million members is spread across 140 countries.

They say a dog is a man’s best friend. We certainly treat them like it: we take our dogs to the best vets, to doggy daycare, and to holistic specialists when they are ill. We buy coats and Halloween costumes, and we set them up with their own blogs, Facebook, and Instagram feeds. But do our dogs—and other animals—feel the same way about us? And what exactly does a dog—or a bat or a dolphin for that matter—think and feel in general?

Gregory Berns, a neuroscientist at Emory University and author of the New York Times bestselling book How Dogs Love Us, pondered these very questions. After viewing photographs of the capture of Osama bin Laden in which dogs were jumping from helicopters under chaotic conditions, Berns had a thought. If a dog could be trained to jump out of a helicopter, why couldn’t a dog be trained to enter an MRI machine? And if that was possible, what if one could compare the functioning of human and dog brains? Berns would be the perfect person to unwrap these mysteries of the animal mind—early in his career he pioneered the use of brain imaging technologies to understand human motivation and decision-making. Could this be a step towards figuring out how dogs think? Berns and his team endeavored to find out.

The results of this experiment is found in Gregory Berns’ groundbreaking new book WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG: And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience (Basic Books; September 5, 2017). Berns’ exploration of the inner minds of dogs, as well as other creatures, heralds a new world, one in which complex intelligence is all around us. As Berns explains, understanding how animals think will revolutionize the way we communicate with them and how we treat them.

 

“An impressive overview of modern neurology and the still-unanswered issues raised by our treatment of our fellow living creatures.”

—Kirkus Reviews

“Groundbreaking research that shows that dog emotions are similar to people.  Training dogs to voluntarily lie still in the MRI brain scanner was a brilliant way to explore the workings of their brains.  Dog lovers and neuroscientists should both read this important book.”

—Temple Grandin, Author of Animals in Translation and Animals Make us Human

“Gregory Berns is a remarkable scientist, whose pioneering MRI studies of the brain across a range of species have opened up a pathway to deeper understanding of animals’ internal awareness and perspectives.  He’s also an exceptional thinker, whose grasp of the ethical and practical significance of his findings for the status and treatment of animals is pervasive in this absorbing work.”

—Wayne Pacelle, President and CEO, The Humane Society of the United States

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG

And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience

By Gregory Berns

Do our dogs love us? Do they really get *that* excited when we come home? Do they like the toys we have bought for them? Do they have the same undying love and affection for us that we have for them? How would we even know if they do? These questions swirled around neuroscientist Dr. Gregory Berns’ mind when his beloved pug, Newton, passed away. He began to wonder if Newton had loved him as much as he had loved him—or if all the affection and tail-wagging just an evolutionary response to gain more treats.

Determined to seek out the answer to these questions, Berns and his team did something nobody had ever attempted: they trained dogs to go into an MRI scanner—completely awake—so he could figure out what they think and feel. What they found was astonishing—dogs, like people, are individuals. They have varying abilities for self-control, how they understand language, and even whether food or companionship is more important. And all of these traits are being revealed in the brains of these MRI-dogs.

The deeper Berns dug into the dog brain, the more obsessed he became with learning about other animals. What if a dog could tell us exactly how she felt? And what would a pig say about a slaughterhouse? What did a whale think about all the noise flooding the ocean from ships and submarines? The result of these investigations would not only enrich our understanding of the inner world of animals—it would inevitably force us to rethink how we treat them.

Now, after five years of research, WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG: And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience (Basic Books, September 5, 2017) lays out what Berns and his team learned. Organized in the order in which Berns and his team endeavored to look at various species, WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG shows us that each animal analysis conducted has a connecting aspect: the structures in the brains of animals are organized in the same way as corresponding parts of our own brains. And not only did these parts look the same, but they functioned in the same way—from dogs and cats to dolphins, sea lions, and even the extinct Tasmanian tiger.

With empathy and humor, Gregory Bernsshows us how animal brains are similar to humans and that we can understand what it is like to be a dog, or a dolphin. His results prove that animals have many experiences and feelings in common with humans. This leads to a startling reconsideration of the rights of animals and the relationships we have with them.

As Berns explains, “All neuroscience is comparative at some level, but few neuroscientists dig deep and ask why the brains of animals look the way they do and how that relates to their mental experiences. These are hard questions. They get at the heart of what makes us human, and they raise troubling issues about the possibility that we may not be that different from many of the creatures with whom we share the planet.”

Many of the world’s species are disappearing at an alarming rate, with the WWF estimates that two-thirds of many species populations may be gone by 2020. In WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG, Berns hopes to raise awareness of the mental lives of the animals with whom we share the planet—and in doing so, provide a new manifesto for animal liberation of the 21st century.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Gregory Berns is a distinguished professor of neuroeconomics at Emory University, where he directs the Center for Neuropolicy and Facility for Education and Research in Neuroscience. He is the author of several books, including the New York Times bestseller How Dogs Love Us. He lives in Atlanta. Follow him at @gberns

ABOUT THE BOOK:

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG

And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience

By Gregory Berns

Published by Basic Books

Publication date: September 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-465-09624-4 · $28.00 / $36.50 CAN · Hardcover · 320 pages

E-book ISBN: 978-0-465-09625-1

Advance Praise for

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A DOG

And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience

By Gregory Berns

(Basic Books; September 5, 2017)

“The author explains that his purpose in writing this book is ‘to raise awareness of the mental lives of the animals with whom we share the planet.’ In that, he succeeds. An impressive overview of modern neurology and the still-unanswered issues raised by our treatment of our fellow living creatures.”

—Kirkus Reviews

“It’s the rare neuroscientist who has the patience and curiosity to train dogs to hop into an MRI machine, tails wagging. Or delve into the mysteries of the dolphin brain. Or venture to the far side of the globe to find the brain of an extinct, yet still fascinating species: the thylacine. Thankfully, Gregory Berns did all of these things. In this big-hearted book, he applies cutting-edge science to questions that have never been so timely: How do other animals perceive their worlds? How do they experience emotions? How does their language work? What It’s Like to Be a Dog is a delightful, illuminating look at the minds and lives of our fellow creatures.”—Susan Casey, author of Voices in the Ocean: A Journey Into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins

“Have you ever wanted to peek inside the mind of a dog? Gregory Berns’ brain scanner does precisely that. But this book also contains many remarkable insights into the inner lives of other animals. Dolphins, sea lions, raccoons, Tasmanian devils – even the long-extinct Tasmanian tiger – they’re all here. A fascinating journey towards an understanding of what dogs – and their mammalian cousins – might be thinking about us.” —John Bradshaw, author of the New York Times bestsellers Dog Sense and Cat Sense and the forthcoming The Animals Among Us

“Berns has done it again; woven a compelling story with a scientific revolution. From building an MRI simulator in his living room to tracking down one of the four remaining brains of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, Berns takes us on an incredible journey of exploration and discovery. Marvelously written and intellectually engaging, What It’s Like to Be a Dog will establish Berns as one of the most skilled neuroscientists of our day, as well someone with the intuition that understanding other animals will lead to greater insight and knowledge about ourselves.” —Dr. Brian Hare, New York Times Bestselling author of The Genius of Dogs

“Dr. Gregory Berns’ new book is a fascinating read. Packed with personal stories, What It’s Like to Be a Dog clearly lays out just who these amazing beings are, from the inside out. We can now learn what each individual animal wants and needs to have the best life possible in a human-centered world, and what we must do to make sure they do.”—Marc Bekoff, University of Colorado, author of The Animals' Agenda: Freedom, Compassion, and Coexistence in the Human Age and Canine Confidential: An Insider's Guide to the Best Lives for Dogs and Us

“We know a lot about the intelligence of animals and nearly nothing about their brains. Greg Berns is changing all of this by means of noninvasive techniques that respect the animals. He is boldly going where no one has gone before, offering a lively, eye-opening peek into his neuroscience kitchen.”—Frans de Waal, author of Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

Talkin' Pets News

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Jarrod Lazarus

Producer - Lexi Lapp

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Jessi Burns, Mutual Rescue Film Participant, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets, 10/7/17 at 530pm EST to discuss her film "Jessi and Andi"  

Mitch Davis, Director and Writer of The Stray will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/07/17 at 630pm EST to discuss his film  

Executive Director of Found Animals, Aimee Gilbreath, will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/06/17 at 721pm EST to discuss Shelters and Microchips

Meet our Executive Director, Aimee Gilbreath

Aimee Gilbreath joined Found Animals in March 2008 as its first full-time employee and Executive Director. She has been responsible for developing and implementing the Foundation’s wide range of innovative programs. Under her leadership the Foundation has grown to over 70 staff members and 500+ volunteers. Found Animals’ programs focus on sterilization, microchipping, and adoption as key levers to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia and span from traditional philanthropy to social enterprise. In addition to providing funding to local spay/neuter non-profits, the Foundation also administers the Michelson Prize and Grants program to encourage development of non-surgical sterilization products. Found Animals provides affordable microchips and scanners, along with a state of the art universal registry, to shelters and clinics nationwide. In Los Angeles, the foundation operates two retail adoption centers that adopt 3,000 shelter pets per year as well as a kitten foster program. Aimee is a former management consultant with significant experience leading teams to solve business problems for Fortune 500 clients. She holds a B.S. in Molecular Biology and an MBA. Aimee lives in Santa Monica, CA with her husband and their beloved pit bull Rufus.

Connect with Aimee on Facebook and Twitter

The Stray movie to open nationwide this Fall

Experience the power of one dog to change everything

(June 15, 2017) LOS ANGELES, CA.. Struck Films, Purdie Distribution and Motive Entertainment announce the upcoming release of The Stray, a heartwarming family film written and directed by Mitch Davis (The Other Side of Heaven) based on a screenplay by Parker Davis with Ken Brailsford executive producing.

Set for release in select markets in the United States on October 6, 2017, The Stray tells the true story of how a one stray dog impacts a struggling family.

That stray dog is “Pluto” who comes out of nowhere and quickly makes himself at home with the Davis family, which is on the brink of falling apart. Dad (Michael Cassidy; Argo, Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice ), is a career-driven personality who’s neglecting his marriage and family. Mom (Sarah Lancaster; Everwood, The Judge) is at her wit’s end raising three young kids. The last thing they need is another mouth to feed. Or is it?

In just a short time with the Davis family, Pluto the “wonderdog” manages to save a lost toddler, bring comfort and companionship to a hurting 9-year-old boy (Connor Corum; Heaven is for Real), help restore a marriage, and repair a broken father-son relationship. Pluto is not only a guard dog - he’s a guardian angel.

The Stray received the Dove Family Approved seal for its portrayal of positive values and is a film you can take your entire family to see.

The Stray is a heartwarming family movie that is wonderfully entertaining, while teaching about love for a pet, love of family and making time for family,” said Donna Rolfe, Dove Foundation.

“It’s really not a stretch to say that Pluto gave me my life back,” said Mitch Davis. “He saved me and my family in more ways than one. And although The Stray reflects my personal story, I know there countless families across America who could say the same thing about a pet that greatly impacted them with its unconditional love - which is why I hope families will see this film together.”

Sometimes help comes from the most unlikely places. Sometimes our prayers get answered in strange ways. Sometimes one dog can change everything.

The Stray will be screened for leaders around the United States this summer. If your organization would be interested in partnering with us on The Stray by hosting a screening or movie premiere on October 5, 2017 in your city, please contact the Motive Screenings Team at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For press inquiries please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Visit The Stray movie website at www.TheStrayResources.com and follow The Stray movie on Facebook and Twitter and follow the conversation at #TheStray.

Animal-Welfare Organization Mutual Rescue™ Launches Fourth Film with PetSmart Charities

“Jessi & Andi” is the uplifting story of a woman who overcomes tragedy with love from a shelter dog

[September 25, 2017], [Silicon Valley, CA] – National animal-welfare initiative Mutual Rescue created a new film series for 2017 in partnership with PetSmart Charities. On August 30, 2017, the organization launched the fourth film in this series: “Jessi & Andi.” Set against the majestic Rockies, it is the uplifting story of two lost souls whose paths crossed at a pivotal moment in both their lives.

Jessi’s boyfriend was always the life of the party. They spent lots of time together as a couple, going out with friends and planning their future marriage. When he took his own life, Jessi was not only shocked and saddened, but also left derailed from the path she had planned with the love of her life.

At night, Jessi couldn’t sleep. During the day, she felt like she couldn’t get out of bed. Life began to lose all meaning. Then one day she was browsing shelter dogs online, trying to take her mind off of her sorrow. That’s when she saw Andi, a lab mix who she says “looked how I felt.”

The more time Jessi spent with Andi, the better she felt. Andi helped renew Jessi’s spirit and her interest in life’s possibilities.

“One of the biggest things I learned from Andi,” Jessi shares, “is how to live in the moment and take joy in the littlest of things. … I think that’s something we could all be better at.”

Mutual Rescue, whose films collectively have garnered over 122 million views, emphasizes bringing local communities together to support both animals and humans. People everywhere have stories to tell about how shelter animals changed their lives for the better, and Mutual Rescue is bringing these stories to light. The 2017 film series highlights this impact, from Pittsburgh to Seattle, from Georgia to the Rockies.

The lives of both people and pets are enriched when homeless animals are adopted and local shelter groups are supported through donations and volunteering in their communities. Visit MutualRescue.org.

Talkin' Pets News

September 23, 2017

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Karen Vance

Producer - Daisey Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Pet Expert and Trainer Travis Brorsen will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 5pm EST to discuss his new series My Big Fat Pet Makeover on Animal Planet

Becky Robinson, President and Founder of Alley Cat Allies will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 9/23/17 at 630pm EST to discuss their organization and their efforts in hurricane relief

Alley Cat Allies Deploys Resources to Gulf Coast for Hurricane Recovery

HOUSTON – Sept. 3, 2017 – Alley Cat Allies has deployed an expert, bilingual disaster response team and is sending additional resources to help Texas and Louisiana organizations rescue cats and other animals whose lives continue to be in peril because of Hurricane Harvey.

“Many people and animals have been displaced, shelters are overflowing and families were forced to make difficult decisions about what to do with their animals,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “There are many cats and other animals who haven’t eaten for days and may be lost from their homes. We are eager to help the courageous people who are finding and saving these animals.”

In many cases, community cats, sometimes called feral cats, were left on their own when their human caregivers evacuated as floodwaters rose. The Alley Cat Allies team will help shelters and caregivers throughout Texas and Louisiana to rebuild programs that were in place to help community cats, including Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). They will also be forming a network of people to check on colonies, resume feeding them and place new cat houses and shelters as necessary.

The Alley Cat Allies disaster response team is starting its work in Spring, a Houston suburb, by assisting the Texas Litter Control (TLC) organization. TLC requested help as a member of the Alley Cat Allies Feral Friends Network. Alley Cat Allies has brought truckloads of traps, dens and cat carriers, which will all be in high demand. Additional supplies such as leashes, cat food, kitty litter, water, blankets and towels are also being delivered.

In Texas and Louisiana, Alley Cat Allies is offering emergency funds to overwhelmed shelters and organizations. In one such case, the Humane Society of Louisiana (HSLA) has used these funds for two disaster-ready transportation vehicles that are facilitating the rescue of hundreds of animals stranded by floodwaters. Jeff Dorson, executive director of HSLA, thanked Alley Cat Allies for helping in a second consecutive year, after the organization previously responded to extreme flooding in 2016.

“Once more, Alley Cat Allies has come to our aid in a time of need,” Dorson said. “This critical support is helping us to save cats and other animals who need our help. The generosity, partnership and good-will are helping us to get through some very challenging days as we try to do as much good as we can.”

Alley Cat Allies will post updates about its hurricane relief efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and donations to support its work can be made online at www.alleycat.org.

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About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Hurricane Preparation Tips for Pet Owners, Cat Caregivers in Path of Irma

BETHESDA, Md. – Sept. 6, 2017 – As Hurricane Irma approaches Florida and the Southeastern United States, Alley Cat Allies, the international advocacy organization dedicated to protecting cats, has assembled a set of Disaster Preparation Tips for community cat caregivers, pet owners, and others involved with animals. These tips will help community cat caregivers and pet owners in the path of Irma weather the storm and keep their cats safe. Among the tips:

  1. Make sure to have descriptions of your pets and the community cats (sometimes called feral cats) you care for, along with photos. If you need to look for displaced cats in shelters or other rescue areas, this will help accurately identify them. Make sure all pet tags and animal microchips have up-to-date information.
  2. Enlist a back-up caregiver who is responsible for the community cats in your absence, and network with other community cat caregivers in your area to set up a ‘buddy system.’ This will create a safety net of care for the cats. You may be able to find other cat caregivers in your area through our Feral Friends Network.
  3. Create an emergency contact card for your pets and community cat colonies in case you are not immediately available. Include all contact information for your substitute caregiver. Carry this card in your wallet and your car, give copies to your backup caregiver, and post it somewhere visible in your home like on the refrigerator.
  4. Make a list of local shelters and their contact information. You will need this information in case you need their help or resources.
  5. Keep an emergency supply kit on hand and know where to find it quickly. Disaster kit basics for pets include a pet first-aid kit, a supply of prescription medications for pets, veterinary and microchip ID records, three to seven days of pet food and dishes, a seven-day supply of bottled water per person and per pet, a litter box and litter, a leash and collar, crate or carrier, blankets, and photos of pets and cats in colonies.

It’s not possible to bring community cats with you when evacuating from disasters, so they need their own special disaster plan. Read our Disaster Proofing a Community Cat Colony resource for guidance.

Finally, you can always reach out to Feral Friends Network members in your area for help in preparing community cats for a disaster or finding them after the danger has passed.

With an active Atlantic hurricane season now under way, it’s important to have a disaster readiness plan in place.  

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