Biography – Elizabeth Sanders, Founder, HorseOPeace.com
Elizabeth Sanders, Founder and CEO HorseOPeace.com, makers of all-natural moisturizing goat milk soaps that are water-free, toxin-free and made with 100% raw goat milk and without any color additives, is an entrepreneur who turned a hobby into a business with customers across the USA and world by offering scented and unscented goat milk soaps that are lustrously creamy and healthy for skin. BeautyStat.com, the #1 beauty and fashion blog, reviewed her company’s soaps as “superior” and available at a “shockingly affordable price.”
HorseOPeace.com is based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where Elizabeth with help of technologically gifted husband Nick spearheading design, website and operational support, offers soaps, creams and lip balms of unsurpassed highest quality. She also homeschools the couple’s 4 sons, aged 1 to 5. In her community activities, she bakes and donates cookies and cakes for a men’s rehabilitation center and at HorseOPeace.com is supportive of our troops by adding free soap to any orders received with a U.S. military address.
Raised in Minnesota, where she was born, and Wisconsin, where her family moved when she was 14, Elizabeth was homeschooled and self-educated in a small farming village where she became a devotee of the Plain People Church (similar to Amish). A decade later she left the church to marry non-member Nick. When in Wisconsin, she formed HorseOPeace.com after years of training horses for rugged farm work and gentleness for families with children. She also volunteered as a horse handler for use with challenged/disabled children. Working outdoors in wintry Wisconsin, her hands would crack, but healed as she began making goat milk soap. Elizabeth knew others could benefit from her wonderful natural toxin-free soaps, so HorseOPeace.com began.
Elizabeth is now a fashion-forward skincare advocate with loyal customers reporting her moisturizing soaps help dry, sensitive skin and conditions from eczema to psoriasis. Her company name reflects a time growing up when farmers called the distance to ride to town as a “horse-a-piece up the road,” a term she adapted to reflect her love of horses and peaceful nature to be HorseOPeace.com as she journeys to achieve the American Dream.

Talkin' Pets News

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Linda Register

Producer - Daisy Charlotte

Network Producer - Quin McCarthy

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Special Guests - Jane Sobel Klonsky, author of Unconditional Older Dogs, Deeper Love will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 1/14/17 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her new book

Jerry Grymek - Doggie Concierge Hotel Penn New York City to discuss our live broadcast for Westminster at 620pm EST

CHRIS GLISSMAN, CEO OF MEOWIJUANA, LLC will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 1/14/17 at 630pm EST to discuss and giveaway his products for cats

Novel drug treats hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common feline heart disease.
source-image
Jan 05, 2017
By dvm360.com staff

UC Davis veterinary cardiologist Joshua Stern performs an echocardiogram on a cat, assisted by animal health technicians Heather Schrader, right, and Judy Schettler. (Photo: Don Preisler/UC Davis)A new drug shows promise for treating heart disease in both cats and people, according to a team of veterinarians and other researchers at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), School of Veterinary Medicine.

The drug, MYK-461, proved effective in a study of five cats with a naturally occurring form of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a currently incurable disease that also affects people, a recent release from UC Davis states.

According to the release, HCM is the most common form of feline heart disease and results in thickening of the walls of the heart ventricles and altering of heart function. Cats with this disease may suffer blood clot formation, congestive heart failure and sudden death. In people, HCM is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death that can even afflict seemingly healthy young athletes.

HCM affects approximately one in 500 people and may affect as many as one in seven cats. More than 1,500 genetic mutations have been associated with the disease in people, creating challenges for researchers. However, veterinary scientists are making strides in identifying the best treatment options for the disease since the feline condition and human condition are so similar.

In the study, treatment with MYK-461 eliminated left ventricular obstruction in five cats with HCM. The novel drug is the first in its class and uniquely addresses the functional changes seen in human and feline HCM, the release states.

“This is an exciting discovery for both animals and humans—an excellent representation of the One Health concept in action,” says Associate Professor Joshua Stern, chief of the Cardiology Service at the UC Davis veterinary hospital. “The positive result in these five cats shows that MYK-461 is viable for use in cats as a possible option to halt or slow the progression of HCM.”

Current treatment for cats with HCM is largely symptomatic. There is no preventative therapy for HCM that is shown to change the course of disease.

“There has been little to no progress in advancing the treatment of HCM in humans or animals for many years,” Stern says. “This study brings new hope for cats and people.”

With this proof of concept that the drug is viable for use in cats, UC Davis hopes to conduct a clinical trial in the near future, which could determine if MYK-461 has the potential to become the accepted protocol for care of cats with HCM.

FDA cites numerous health dangers


January 3, 2017
By: Edie Lau
For The VIN News Service

 


Photo courtesy of Valley Animal Hospital
Powdered medical gloves, such as this supply at a veterinary hospital in New Jersey, must be thrown away to comply with a federal ban that takes effect this month.

Powdered medical gloves are going the way of powdered wigs.

A once ubiquitous staple of doctors, powdered gloves are being thrown out of exam and operating rooms by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as of Jan. 18. The reason: The powder poses a variety of risks to wearers, patients and even bystanders.

The dangers include severe airway inflammation from inhaling the powder; wound inflammation and post-surgical adhesions from contact with the powder; and respiratory allergic reactions from breathing powder that carries proteins from natural rubber latex gloves. The most common type of powder used in gloves is cornstarch, according to the FDA.

The coming ban is absolute — there’s no grace period for using up existing supplies. “[T]he risks of illness or injury to individuals who are currently exposed to these devices is [as] equally unreasonable and substantial as it would be for future individuals that might be exposed to powdered gloves,” the FDA stated in a March 22, 2016, Federal Register notice proposing the ban. The ban was made final on Dec. 19.

Although glove use in veterinary medicine is not explicitly mentioned in the FDA rule, the prohibition applies in the veterinary sphere, too, an agency spokeswoman confirmed.

“The ban applies to powdered surgeon’s gloves, powdered patient examination gloves, and absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon’s glove that are already in commercial distribution and for these devices that are already sold to the ultimate user, such as small medical practices and hospitals. As such, it applies to ... gloves that are in use at veterinary practices,” the spokeswoman, Deborah Kotz, said by email.

Asked how the ban will be enforced, Kotz replied: “The FDA can take various enforcement actions, if necessary, to remove banned devices from the market, including seizure of the product, civil money penalties or criminal prosecution.”

She declined to say what criminal charges could be brought, or the potential size of fines.

The FDA recommends unused inventories of gloves be disposed of like any community solid waste, which usually is by burial in a landfill or by incineration.

Dr. Bruce Henderson, hospital director of Valley Animal Hospital in Clifton, New Jersey, estimates that his practice has $150 worth of powdered gloves in stock. “I’m just going to pitch them all in the garbage and buy new ones,” he said in a message-board discussion  on the Veterinary Information Network, an online community for the profession.

Henderson said he wouldn’t want to risk creating a situation in which employees claim harm from the use of banned gloves. Moreover, he’s already largely made the transition to powder-free gloves and prefers them.

“My associate requested non-powdered gloves when she started working here a few years ago, so we switched over. I like the non-powdered way better!!” he wrote on VIN.

Henderson explained by email that he likes not getting powder all over himself when he removes the gloves.

Some veterinarians are less enthused about switching.


VIN News Service photo
Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a practitioner in Wisconsin, has been dissatisfied so far with powder-less gloves. She hopes her clinic will find other styles that work better. “I’m sure we’ll all get used to the new gloves eventually,” she said.

Dr. Karen Vanderloo, a veterinarian at Oregon Veterinary Clinic near Madison, Wisconsin, is unimpressed with the performance of non-powdered gloves.

“Anticipating the change, we got a shipment of the powder-free gloves about six to eight weeks ago, and the general consensus was not favorable,” she told the VIN News Service by email. “They’re more difficult to put on, especially immediately after scrub prep before surgery, and because of the rolled cuff, are harder to put on in sterile fashion — the rolled edge keeps folding/rolling on itself.”

Other practitioners cite the difficulty of donning powder-less gloves with sweaty hands. That’s one advantage of powdered gloves, the FDA noted. “The benefits of powdered gloves appear to only include greater ease of donning and doffing, decreased tackiness and a degree of added comfort …” the agency stated in its notice of the final rule.

These benefits, the FDA concluded, “are nominal when compared to the risks posed by these devices.”

Long history of problems

The use of lubricant powders in surgical gloves dates to the late 19th century. At the time, the powders consisted of the spores of Lycopodium, an evergreen herb also known as club moss.

“By the 1930s, Lycopodium powder was recognized to cause wound granulomas and adhesion formation and was replaced by talcum powder (chemically, hydrous magnesium silicate) … In the 1940s, talcum powder (talc) was also recognized to be a cause of postoperative adhesions and granuloma formation. In 1947, modified cornstarch powder was introduced ...” according to the FDA.

Despite changes in powder type, problems persisted. In 1997, FDA issued a Medical Glove Powder Report that described the risks of glove powder and the state of the medical-glove market. Because no good alternatives to powdered gloves existed at the time, the agency opted not to ban them: “The report concluded that banning powdered gloves in 1997 would cause a market shortage of medical gloves, which could result in inferior glove products and increased costs to the U.S. health care system …”

Public pressure caused the FDA to revisit the issue some years later. Between 2008 and 2011, the agency received three petitions asking it to ban the use of cornstarch powder on latex and synthetic surgical and examining gloves.

One of the petitions accompanied a report published by the American Journal of Emergency Medicine in 2009 discussing the dangers of cornstarch powder on medical gloves. The authors stated that Germany banned surgical glove cornstarch powder in 1997, and that the United Kingdom’s purchasing and supply agency stopped purchasing gloves lubricated with cornstarch in 2000.

In 2011, the FDA put out a call for public comments on the risks and benefits of powdered gloves.

The agency also considered issuing a formal warning about the risks of gloves, but, as explained in the rule finalizing the ban, concluded that warning labels would be inadequate:

“[P]atients often do not know the type of gloves being worn by the health-care professional treating them, but are still exposed to the potential dangers. Similarly, glove powder’s ability to aerosolize and carry NRL (natural rubber latex) proteins exposes individuals to harm via inhalation or surface contact. Thus, some of the risks posed by glove powder can impact persons completely unaware or unassociated with its employment and without the opportunity to consider the devices’ labeling.”

Perhaps just as compellingly, the agency now believes that the market easily can handle the switch. “Our searches … revealed that the market is saturated with alternatives to powdered gloves, resulting in downward pressure on the prices of non-powdered gloves. In addition, the share of powdered medical gloves sales has been declining since at least 2000, while total sales of all disposable medical gloves have increased.”

Glove manufacturers largely have supported phasing out powder. In an interview published by the magazine Infection Control Today in late 2015, representatives of several manufacturers said unequivocally that the health concerns are valid. They also said alternative gloves are abundantly available. A representative of Halyard Health (formerly Kimberly-Clark Health Care) said her company sells only non-powdered exam gloves. Medline Industries' representative said his company offers 20 different powder-free options with synthetic polymer coatings inside the gloves to make donning and double-gloving easier.

Henry Schein, a leading distributor of medical, dental and veterinary supplies, states on its website that it carries “a wide selection of powder-free latex medical exam gloves manufactured by reputable companies,” and names seven makers plus its own private-label brand.

The FDA cites statistics suggesting that the timing of the ban should be no trouble for the vast majority of practitioners: “[R]ecent projections of annual gloves sales indicate that at least 93 percent of medical providers have switched to non-powdered gloves.”

The FDA notes that while manufacturers will be prohibited as of Jan. 18 from importing powdered gloves, they may export powdered gloves to countries where they are lawful. The agency does not address the ethics of exporting products that it has judged to present an unacceptable health risk.

VIN News Service staff writers Christy Corp-Minamiji and Phyllis DeGioia contributed to this report.

Meowijuana Launches Catnip Product Line
for "Cats Who Need the Weed"
PRESS RELEASE NOV 29, 2016 08:00 CST
Meowijuana, a catnip company, launches new product line
that makes a great holiday gift and is available for pet
stores to sell nationwide.
Kansas City, Missouri, November 29, 2016 (Newswire.com) - Meowijuana LLC, a catnip
company, has launched a new product line that is creatively branded and plays on the
euphoric "high" some cats have from catnip. The company sells 100 percent organic catnip
that is available for shipping both domestically and internationally. Meowijuana’s legendary
catnip is grown in Southern California and Washington State.
Although the company uses the trademarked tag line, “For cats who need the weed”, there is
no actual marijuana in the product. It is perfectly safe and legal for both cats, and even
people, to consume. Catnip, which is from the mint family, contains the chemical
nepetalactone, which triggers a sense of euphoria in susceptible cats. But not all cats react
to catnip. Pet MD has noted that sensitivity to catnip is an inherited trait effecting 50 to 75
percent of cats. Catnip produces a different response depending on how it’s consumed.
Sniffing catnip produces a stimulant effect while eating it can cause sedation in cats.
The company also sells the product similarly to the
way marijuana dispensaries do in Colorado and
other states where it is legal. Meowijuana’s Purple
Passion Jars offer the product in clear re-sealable
jars. The catnip buds were harvested during peak oil
product providing cats the next-level catnip
experience. For the most dedicated catnip
connoisseurs, Meowijuana offers the Grand Daddy
Purr Cigar Box. The humidity-regulated cigar boxes
are filled with the finest 100 percent organic Grand
Daddy Purr Catnip buds. The company even offers their customers, a Medical Meowijuana ID
card, which includes the cat’s pictures, name, sex and date of birth.
“We offer the highest-quality, pet-safe, organic catnip you will find on the market today all
packaged in a unique branding concept that our customers love,” says Chris Glissman, CEO
"We offer the highest-quality, petsafe,
organic catnip you will find on
the market today all packaged in a
unique branding concept that our
customers love. Our team has a
great time marketing our product,
which is a great gift for your cat.
Plus our customers enjoy the
shopping experience."
CHRIS GLISSMAN, CEO OF
MEOWIJUANA, LLC
of Meowijuana, LLC. “Our team has a great time marketing our product, which is a great gift
for your cat. Plus our customers enjoy the shopping experience.”
The company has also opened up their unique product line for pet stores nationwide. For
more details, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To learn more about the product, see all the
company offers and make an online purchase, visit Shop.Meowijuana.com.
About Meowijuana, LLC
Meowijuana, LLC is the purveyor of 100 percent organic catnip as well as cat toys and
apparel. For more information, visit Shop.Meowijuana.com.

UNCONDITIONAL

Older Dogs, Deeper Love

By

Jane Sobel Klonsky

Anyone who has ever shared life with a dog knows that the human-canine bond is one that only grows stronger as dogs get older. For years celebrated photographer and dog lover Jane Sobel Klonsky longed to pursue a project featuring dogs but couldn’t find the right catalyst. It wasn't until a chance meeting at an insurance office in 2012 led her to witness the incredible relationship between Angela, the insurance broker, and her senior Bulldog, Clementine, that it came to her. Since then Jane has traveled the United States with one mission: to capture images and stories that focus on the powerful relationship between humans and their older dogs.

Her book UNCONDITIONAL: Older Dogs, Deeper Love(National Geographic Books; October 25, 2016; $19.95; 208 pages) is a captivating collection of photographs and stories that celebrates humans' special bond with, and love for, their senior dogs. The dogs represented in the book include senior rescues with their adopters, service dogs with those they assist and guide, working dogs with their handlers, and lifelong cherished family pets with the people who dote on them.For each of her subjects, Jane collected personal accounts of their lives intertwined with their canine companions. Together with the photographs, these raw, funny, sometimes heartbreaking stories celebrate the enduring bond between humans and dogs.

Of Jane's photographs, bestselling author Lewis Blackwell says, “Jane has brought her strong photographic sensibilities to explore a delicate and moving subject in a profoundly touching way. It’s a subject that seems tailor-made for the warmth that comes naturally to her images, and yet also enables her to open out and reveal a strong documentary edge.”

UNCONDITIONAL will resonate with anyone now enjoying a close bond with a pet, and it will provide comfort to those who have lost old friends. It’s a beautiful reminder to cherish our older animals and the rich moments we have with them, and to thank them for the love and friendship they unconditionally offer us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Jane Sobel Klonsky launched her photography career in 1976 as the first photographer to scale the cables to the top of the Verrazano Bridge to get a shot of the start of the New York City Marathon. For nearly thirty years, she was a major player in the world of commercial and sports photography. Her work has taken her around the world to Kenya to shoot photos of a family of Masaai Warriors; to record an international running competition in Tokyo; and to chronicle the untouched beauty of far-reaching places like Papua New Guinea, and Myanmar (Burma). Her award-winning photographs have been published widely, and have been the subject of several books, including one based on a 50,000 mile cross-country photographic tour of rural America taken with her photographer husband and two Great Danes. She continues to do extensive work for Getty Images. Mother to up-and-coming filmmaker Kacey, she lives with her husband, Arthur, their two therapy dogs, Charlie and Sam, and a cat, Humphrey, in rural Vermont.

UNCONDITIONAL

Older Dogs, Deeper Love

by Jane Sobel Klonsky

October 25, 2016

National Geographic Books

$19.95

ISBN: 978-1426217111

208 Pages

Talking About Pets to Start the New Year
Dr. Susan Dalton to be featured on Florida-based radio show “Talkin’ Pets Radio this Saturday, January 6th 2017.
SANTA BARBARA, CA (January, 2017) – When it comes to dog training and canine nutrition, few people know as
much about the subjects as certified dog trainer, Dr. Susan Dalton. With over ten years of experience training
dogs using positive reinforcement techniques, Dr. Dalton has dedicated herself to educating owners on how to
promote good behaviors with their troubled dogs so they will be happier, healthier, and more loyal. This
weekend, Jon Patch of “Talkin’ Pets Radio” will host Dr. Susan Dalton to explore her signature training
methodology and the unique dog treats that make this training extremely productive.
The show will air on Saturday, January 7th at 6:35 PM EST (3:35 PM PST). Listeners can tune in live at
http://talkinpets.com/new/media-gallery/listen-live-2.html to learn about dog training tips and for a chance to
win a bag of Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats.
Dr. Dalton developed her Em-Pet-Thetic™ training methodology after the difficult challenge of training her own
dog, Cassie. From this experience, she learned the importance of establishing trust and understanding between
shy and aggressive dogs and their owners. Without a strong foundational bond, a dog can be reluctant or afraid
to respond to training efforts. In 2009, Dr. Dalton founded the California School for Dogs and has since trained
dozens of dogs using the principles of positive reinforcement and her Em-Pet-Thetic training program.
Positive reinforcement involves prompting good behaviors and rewarding them when they occur. Just like when
parents give their child something special for receiving good grades, giving dogs treats encourages them to
repeat the behavior. According to the Humane Society, positive reinforcement is one of the most powerful ways
to shape or change a dog’s behavior.1 In addition, Dr. Dalton contends that positive reinforcement is the basis
for addressing such undesirable behaviors as barking, running out the door, and teaching the command “stay.”
One of the cornerstones of positive reinforcement training is the frequent use of treats. Unhappy with the
choices of dog treats available, Dr. Dalton developed her very own high-quality treats: Dr. Dalton’s Premium
Treats. Made with just meat, these signature treats are high in protein and contain no additives, chemicals, or
1http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/dog_training_positive_reinforcement.html?referrer=https://ww
w.google.com/
preservatives, making them the ideal treat for training purposes. In fact, they are the only treat that Dr. Dalton
allows her clients to use during her Em-Pet-Thetic training sessions because they are nutritious and of high-value
to the dogs-in-training.
To find these special treats, go to www.drdalton.com.
About Dr. Susan Dalton and Dr. Daltons Premium Treats
Dr. Susan Dalton grew up surrounded by animals of all kinds - dogs, cats, chickens, snakes, and even salt water
fish. After receiving her Ph.D., she worked with troubled adolescents and served as both a university professor
and researcher. Dr. Dalton began training dogs after adopting Cassie, a 10-week old Border Collie who had been
rescued from under a car. Cassie was traumatized; fearful and aggressive. When Dr. Dalton consulted various
“experts” on how to best rehabilitate Cassie, all of the trainers she spoke with labeled the pup unworkable - a
hopeless case.
Drawing upon her decades of experience in behavior modification, Dr. Dalton began reading everything she
could about dog training, and personally developed a highly effective program based on positive reinforcement.
Using this philosophy, she founded the California School for Dogs Inc. in 2009. Since then, Dr. Dalton has trained
hundreds of dogs - specializing in frightened, aggressive and traumatized animals.
With healthy treats being a cornerstone of her training program, Dr. Dalton wasn’t satisfied with the dog treat
options available to her. She started making her own treats in 2012, using clean and simple ingredients like
chicken, beef, and pork. It was her clients who convinced her to make her treats available for purchase. Since
then, Dr. Dalton has mastered the creation of a dog treat that is both healthy and doggy-delicious.
All of Dr. Dalton’s Premium Pet treats are sourced, produced, and packaged in the USA. They can be purchased
at www.DrDaltons.com and come in three flavors – Simply Beef, Simply Chicken and Meat Medley (made from
beef, chicken, and pork).
For more information about Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats, or to interview Dr. Susan Dalton, please contact Gillian
Christie at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 805-969-3744. Visit www.DrDaltons.com.
###

By: Alexandra Wepner
Original Publish Date: January 4, 2017

As verified by Pet Age, the J.M. Smucker Company yesterday announced in a press release a limited voluntary recall on certain lots of 9Lives, EverPet, and Special Kitty canned cat food due to possible low levels of thiamine (Vitamin B1).

The issue was discovered by the Quality Assurance team during review of production records at the manufacturing facility. No illnesses related to this issue have been reported to date and the product is being recalled out of an abundance of caution.

Cats fed diets low in thiamine for several weeks may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Thiamine is essential for cats. Symptoms of deficiency displayed by an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature. Early signs of thiamine deficiency may include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting, and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurological signs can develop, which include ventroflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, circling, falling, and seizures. Contact your veterinarian immediately if your cat is displaying any of these symptoms. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.

The affected product was distributed to a limited number of retail customers from December 20 through January 3, 2017.

The affected production includes the following:

Brand

Product Description

UPC Code Consumer Unit

Lot Numbers

Units per Case

Selling Unit Size

UPC Code

on

Case

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Chicken and Tuna

7910052238

6354803

12

13 oz

7910052228

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Seafood Platter

7910000402

6356803

24

5.5 oz

7910000402

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Seafood Platter

7910000367

6355803

6

4pk
5.5 oz each

7910003670

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Super Supper

7910000327

6358803

24

5.5 oz

7910000327

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Super Supper

7910000286

6358803

6

4pk
5.5 oz each

7910002860

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Super Supper

7910052239

6355803

12

13 oz

7910052229

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate Super Supper

7910052239

6364803

12

13 oz

7910052229

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Chicken and Seafood

7910000364 (793641)

6356803

6

4pk
5.5 oz each

7910003640

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Chicken and Tuna

7910000324

6356803

24

5.5 oz

7910000324

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Chicken Dinner

7910000410

6356803

24

5.5 oz

7910000410

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Liver and Chicken

7910000312 (793121)

6355803

6

4pk
5.5 oz each

7910000312

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Ocean Whitefish

7910000420

6358803

24

5.5 oz

7910000420

 

9Lives

Seafood Poultry Variety Pack

7910053377

6307803

24

5.5 oz

7910053377

 

9Lives

Meaty Pate with Chicken & Tuna

7910000366

6357803

6

4pk
5.5 oz each

7910003660

 

EverPet

Mixed Grill Dinner

7910053114

6356803

12

13 oz

7910053114

 

Special Kitty

Beef and Liver Dinner

8113112120

6355803

12

13 oz

8113112120

 

Special Kitty

Classic Tuna Dinner

8113112157

6358803

12

13 oz

8113112157

 

Special Kitty

Mixed Grill Dinner with printed wrap

8113109609

6355803

1

12 pk
13 oz each

8113109609

 

Special Kitty

Mixed Grill Dinner without printed wrap

8113112119

6356803

12

13 oz

8113112119

 

Special Kitty

Super Supper

8113179041

6355803

12

13 oz

7910079041

 

No other products of The J.M. Smucker Company are affected by this recall.

Consumers who have cans of cat food from the impacted lots should stop feeding it to their cats and call 1-800-828-9980 Monday through Friday 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM EST or contact the company at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

 
 
 
 
  

Dear Jon,

As 2017 begins and we ring in the new year, you’ll be pleased to know we have signed copies of this year’s official Doris Day calendar up for auction on eBay. This year we have only 10 signed calendars for auction, so click here to bid now.

These calendars, in the special collector’s A3 size (12" x 17"), are a very limited edition – only 12 copies were pressed worldwide! The Doris Day Animal Foundation has 10 of the 12 up for auction, and they have been personally hand-signed by Doris Day. And, as in years before, all proceeds will benefit DDAF, so please bid generously.

All images featured in this year's calendar were professionally scanned and restored from original photographic prints, transparencies or negatives.

This auction will run for seven days, with 10 winners to be determined on January 10, 2017.  So be sure to watch the bidding carefully. Click here now to get in on the fun!

Best wishes for a happy, healthy New Year.

The DDAF Team

 
 
 
empowered by Salsa

Bob Barker

Bob Barker

Born

Robert William Barker
December 12, 1923 (age 93)
Darrington, Washington, U.S.

Occupation

Television personality
Game show host

Years active

1950–present

Height

6'1" (1.88 m)[1]

Spouse(s)

Dorothy Jo Gideon (m. 1945; d. 1981)

Robert William "Bob" Barker (born December 12, 1923) is an American former television game show host. He is best known for hosting CBS's The Price Is Right from 1972 to 2007, making it the longest-running daytime game show in North American television history, and for hosting Truth or Consequences from 1956 to 1974.

Born in Darrington, Washington to modest circumstances, Barker enlisted in the United States Navy during World War II. Barker worked part-time in radio while he attended college. In 1950, Barker moved to California in order to pursue a career in broadcasting. He was given his own radio show, The Bob Barker Show, which ran for the next six years.[2] Barker began his game show career in 1956, hosting Truth or Consequences. From there, he hosted various game shows as well as the Miss Universe and Miss USA pageants from 1967 to 1987 giving him the distinction of being the longest serving host of these pageants. Eventually, he began hosting The Price Is Right in 1972. When his wife Dorothy Jo died, Barker became an advocate for animal rights and of animal-rights activism, supporting groups such as the United Activists for Animal Rights and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. In 2007, Barker retired from hosting The Price Is Right after celebrating his 50-year career on television.

Barker was born in Darrington, Washington, and spent most of his youth on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The U.S. Indian Census Rolls, 1885–1940, list Barker as an official member of the Sioux tribe.[3][4][5] His mother, Matilda ("Tillie") Valandra (née Matilda Kent Tarleton), was a school teacher; his father, Byron John Barker, was the foreman on the electrical high line through the state of Washington. Barker is 1/8 Sioux.[6] While in Washington, his father fell from a tower and sustained an injury which resulted in his death in 1929. Barker has a half-brother, Kent Valandra, from Matilda's subsequent remarriage. In 1931, the family moved to Springfield, Missouri, where Barker graduated from Central High School in 1941.

Barker attended Drury College (now Drury University) in Springfield, on a basketball scholarship.[2] He was a member of the Epsilon Beta Chapter of Sigma Nu fraternity at Drury.[7] On the outbreak of World War II, Barker served in the United States Navy as a fighter pilot. However, the war ended before he was assigned to a seagoing squadron. After the war, he returned to Drury to finish his education, graduating summa cum laude with a degree in economics.[2]

Career

Broadcasting career

While attending college in Drury, Barker worked his first "media job", at KTTS-FM Radio, in Springfield. He left Springfield and the couple moved to Lake Worth, Florida, and he was news editor and announcer at nearby WWPG 1340 AM in Palm Beach (now WPBR in Lantana).[8] In 1950, Barker moved to California in order to pursue a career in broadcasting. He was given his own radio show, The Bob Barker Show, which ran for the next six years from Burbank.[2] He was hosting an audience-participation radio show on KNX (AM) in Los Angeles when game show producer Ralph Edwards happened to be listening and liked Barker's voice and style.[9]

Game show career

Barker started hosting Truth or Consequences on December 31, 1956 and continued with the program until 1974.[10] The idea was to mix the original quiz element of game shows with wacky stunts. On the show, people had to answer a trivia question correctly (usually an off-the-wall question that no one would be able to answer correctly) before "Beulah the Buzzer" was sounded. If the contestant did not complete the "Truth" portion, there was a "Consequences", usually a zany and embarrassing stunt. If the contestant answered the question, invariably, the question had a second part. In addition, during Barker's run as host, "Barker's Box" was played. Barker's Box was a box with four drawers in it. If a contestant was able to pick all three drawers with money inside before picking the empty drawer, they won a bonus prize.

It was on Truth or Consequences that the salute became his trademark sign-off; he ended each episode with "Bob Barker saying goodbye, and hoping all your consequences are happy ones!"[citation needed]

End of the Rainbow (1957–58)

On December 4, 1957, Barker began hosting a new Ralph Edwards creation, the short-lived End of the Rainbow for NBC. On this show (similar to Barker's Truth or Consequences and Edwards' This Is Your Life), he and co-host Art Baker went out to various places in America and surprised the less-fortunate who helped others when they could barely help themselves.

For example, the first episode featured a Minneapolis grocer who, in return for his community service, was given a complete makeover to his store plus new furniture and appliances for his home. In addition, his landlord (who was in on the surprise) announced that the current month's rent was free and that the grocer's rent would never increase.

The Family Game (1967)

In 1967, Barker hosted the short-lived game show The Family Game for Chuck Barris, where he asked children contestants questions about their families' lives, and the parents had to guess how they answered, similar to The Newlywed Game.

Simon Says (1971)

In 1971, Barker was tapped to host a pilot for NBC entitled Simon Says, which required him to interact with a giant computer called "Simon" in Let's Make A Deal-style "trades". The pilot was produced by Wesley J. Cox of DUNDAS Productions, and its theme was "The Savers" (the theme used on The Joker's Wild, which has led some to believe that Cox or DUNDAS was an alias for Jack Barry or Dan Enright, since Joker used the theme in its original 1968 pilot). There is at least one (somewhat low-quality) clip of the pilot on the video sharing website YouTube.[11]

That's My Line (1980–81)

In 1980, Barker hosted a series called That's My Line for Goodson-Todman. The series was not a game show, but rather a program along the lines of Real People and That's Incredible! The show's second season in 1981 focused more on unusual stunts, and was cancelled in September.

In early 1972, Mark Goodson and Bill Todman began shopping a modernized revival of The Price Is Right to stations, with Dennis James as host. CBS expressed interest in the series, on one condition: instead of James, Barker would be installed as host. After some initial resistance, Barker instead offered to host another upcoming CBS game show, Jack Barry's The Joker's Wild (which had difficulty finding a host and was scheduled to debut the same day as Price) to allow James to host Price, but CBS rejected this proposal.[12] The eventual compromise that was struck led to Barker hosting the daytime Price on CBS, James hosting the weekly nighttime Price in syndication, and Jack Barry himself (first on a trial basis, then eventually permanently) hosting Joker.

On September 4, 1972, Barker began hosting the CBS revival of The Price Is Right.[13] In the 35 years of the CBS version, Barker became far more associated with the series than first host Bill Cullen was with the 1956–65 original. When James's contract for the nighttime Price expired without being renewed in 1977, Barker assumed hosting duties for three nighttime seasons as well, with the nighttime series eventually ending in 1980.

On October 15, 1987, Barker did what other MCs almost never did: renounced hair dye and began wearing his hair gray, which was its natural color by that time.[14] Fellow hosts Monty Hall, Alex Trebek, and Richard Dawson did the same in the late 1980s.[citation needed]

Barker took over the role of executive producer for the show in 1988, following the death of the original executive producer, Frank Wayne. In this capacity, Barker created several pricing games, instituted a prohibition on foreign cars and animal-based products (see "Animal rights" below), and launched a prime-time series of specials known as The Price Is Right $1,000,000 Spectacular.

In 2006, The Price Is Right marked its 35th consecutive year on the air. It is the longest-running game show of all time in North America, and at the time was the last surviving show in the daytime game show genre, having survived (at the time) twelve years after its last competitor had been canceled. (CBS later revived daytime game shows in 2009.) Overall, in daytime programming (excluding Saturday and Sunday), The Price Is Right is ranked sixth among the longest-continuing daytime television programs (NBC's Today ranks the longest, followed by four daytime soap operas: Guiding Light, As the World Turns, General Hospital, and Days of Our Lives), and moved into fifth in September 2009 after Guiding Light aired its final episode on CBS. It has won its time slot (11:00 a.m. Eastern) for the past 25 years with its closest competitor (currently ABC's The View) normally getting about half of TPIR's ratings.

On October 31, 2006, Barker made his announcement that he would retire from The Price Is Right in June 2007.[15] He taped his final episode on June 6, 2007, with the show airing twice on June 15.[16] The first airing was in the show's normal daytime slot and the second airing was in primetime as the lead-in to the Daytime Emmy Awards. Repeat episodes from Barker's final season continued to air until October 12, 2007, ending with a repeat of his final episode. On July 23 it was announced that comedian Drew Carey would take Barker's place as the new host for the show beginning on October 15, 2007.

During Barker's tenure as host, three pricing games were introduced that used his name: Barker's Bargain Bar, Barker's Markers and Trader Bob. Of the three, the latter two are not actively played on the show – Trader Bob was retired from the show in 1985, Barker's Marker$ was renamed Make Your Mark following Barker's retirement, and subsequently retired, and Barker's Bargain Bar has been retooled as the Bargain Game after a four-year hiatus between 2008 and 2012.

After his retirement, Barker made three return appearances to The Price is Right. He first appeared on the episode that aired on April 16, 2009 to promote his new autobiography, Priceless Memories. He appeared in the Showcase round at the end of the show.[17]

Barker made another guest appearance on the show to celebrate his 90th birthday celebration, which aired on December 12, 2013. He announced a contestant for the first time ever on the show, along with one showcase.[18]

Barker also made a surprise appearance on April 1, 2015 for an April Fools' Day switch where he took Drew's place at the show's intro. He hosted the first one bid and pricing game of that day before handing the hosting duties back to Drew.[19]

Personal life

Barker married his high-school sweetheart Dorothy Jo Gideon on January 12, 1945. They remained married for 36 years until her death on October 19, 1981 of lung cancer. They had no children, and Barker has not remarried. However, he was involved in a relationship with Price model Dian Parkinson from 1989 to 1991, which ended in legal action.

Health

Barker has suffered some minor health problems. Around 1982, he had a herniated disc and sciatica.[citation needed] Greater health problems began in 1991 after he complained of vision problems while exercising. After a visit to his doctor, he was sent to see a neurologist, who told Barker he had had a mild stroke. He recovered and went back to work.[citation needed]

On September 16, 1999, Barker was in Washington, D.C., to testify before Congress regarding HR 2929: the Captive Elephant Accident Prevention Act, the proposed legislation that would ban elephants from traveling shows (i.e., circuses). While preparing for the presentation, Barker experienced what he called "clumsiness" in his right hand. He was admitted to George Washington University Hospital and diagnosed with a partially blocked left carotid artery. Barker underwent carotid endarterectomy to remove the blockage. The procedure went well enough that he was able to return to work within the month.[citation needed]

Three years later, Barker had two additional health crises after taping the 30th season finale of The Price is Right. While lying in the sun on May 30, 2002, he experienced a stroke and was hospitalized; six weeks later, on July 11, Barker underwent prostate surgery. Both hospitalizations occurred at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Both surgeries were successful.[20]

Barker has had several mild bouts with skin cancer, a result of his frequent tanning. He consults a dermatologist regularly to make sure any cancers are caught and removed before they spread; they do not currently pose a threat to his life. During a televised interview, Barker told viewers, "I urge anyone who has spent some time in the sun, whether you're doing it now or not, go to a dermatologist once a year."[21]

On September 17, 2010, Barker collapsed at a Los Angeles shooting range. He was treated at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for an adverse drug reaction and released.[22]

On October 20, 2015, police and rescue personnel were summoned nearby Barker's Los Angeles-area home, where they found the game show host had fallen on the sidewalk and injured his head. An ambulance rushed him to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was treated for lacerations on his head, but found not to be seriously injured. He was released and fully recuperated.[23][24]

Animal rights

Barker became a vegetarian in 1979. That same year, he began promoting animal rights. He was named national spokesman for "Be Kind to Animals Week" in May 1985. On A&E's Biography program, he credited his wife, Dorothy Jo, with causing him to become more aware of animal rights and becoming a vegetarian, because she had done so. Bob remarked that Dorothy Jo was way ahead of her time as far as animal rights were concerned and that shortly after her death in October 1981 he took up animal rights in order to keep doing something that she had done.

Barker began ending some episodes (later every episode) of The Price Is Right with the phrase: "Help control the pet population. Have your pets spayed or neutered." After he retired, Drew Carey continued his signature sign-off advocating neutering. Fellow game-show hosts Jack Barry and Bert Convy eventually followed Barker's lead in promoting animal rights on the air.[32]

Barker hosted the Miss USA/Universe Pageants from 1967 to 1987. In 1987, he requested the removal of fur prizes and stepped down as host when those in charge of the pageant refused.[32]

Barker's DJ&T Foundation, founded in 1994 and named after his wife and mother, has contributed millions of dollars for animal neutering programs[33] and to fund animal rescue and park facilities all over the United States. He worked closely with Betty White as an advocate for animal rights.[32][34] However, in 2009, reports indicated that Barker threatened to not attend the 2009 Game Show Awards (but was seen in the audience), where he was to receive a lifetime achievement award, because White would be attending. The reason for the conflict, according to the report, was over the proper treatment of an elephant at the Los Angeles Zoo. White instead did not attend and pre-recorded her comments that she was scheduled to make about Mark Goodson.[35]

In 2004, Barker donated $1 million to Columbia University School of Law to support the study of animal rights.[36] The gift has funded an adjunct professorship in animal rights law at Columbia and helped fund a student clinic in environmental law.

Barker also supported United Activists for Animal Rights, and together with the group, publicly accused several media projects and the American Humane Association of animal mistreatment or the condoning of animal mistreatment, a tactic which resulted in a major lawsuit against him and the group, accusing him of spurious allegations.[37]

In June 2009, Barker wrote Chief Michell Hicks of the Cherokee asking that their reservation's bear exhibit be closed.[38] On July 28, 2009, he visited the reservation and saw one of the three zoos, calling the bears' living situation "inhumane". PETA set up the visit after Barker heard from U.S. Representative Bill Young, (R) Florida, whose wife had been "appalled" by what she saw. Annette Tarnowski, the tribe's attorney general, said a federal inspector had found nothing wrong in May 2009 at two of the zoos, and that the tribe had dealt with the few violations at the third. Hicks made no promises and threatened to ban PETA if they made more trouble.[39]

In January 2010, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society announced that it had secretly purchased and outfitted a ship to interdict Japanese whaling operations in the Southern Ocean using $5,000,000 provided by Barker. The ship was then named the MY Bob Barker, and its existence was first revealed when it helped discover the location of the Japanese whaling fleet.[40] In 2010, Barker began funding the cost of a helicopter, named the Nancy Burnet (after the president of United Activists for Animal Rights); the helicopter accompanies the society's fleet.[41]

In March 2010, PETA announced that it received a $2.5 million donation from Barker to help establish a new office called the Bob Barker Building in Los Angeles.[42] PETA officially opened the Bob Barker Building on Sunset Boulevard in 2012.[43] The Grand Opening was attended by Christian Serratos, Stephanie Pratt, Moby, Kate del Castillo, Sasha Grey, Renee Olstead, Fivel Stewart, Diane Warren, and Allisyn Ashley Arm.[44][45]

Film and other TV appearances

Awards and honors

Autobiography

Bob Barker has written his autobiography, assisted by former L.A. Times Book Review editor Digby Diehl, titled Priceless Memories. It was published on April 6, 2009, and features stories from his early life as well as stories and experiences in the 50 years of his television career.[9]

It was also then reported that Barker would appear on The Price is Right to promote his book. His initial appearance was scheduled for the March 2, 2009 taping. However, the taping was postponed until March 25, due to host Drew Carey's bout with pneumonia. The episode aired on April 16, during which Barker appeared during the Showcases to promote the book.[62] Carey stated in an interview that the show stopped taping for over an hour as the crowd continued to give Barker a standing ovation, and to allow the audience to ask questions about what Barker was doing post-retirement.[citation needed]

Page 1 of 92