BIOGRAPHY - Dr Roger Mugford

Dr Mugford obtained a Bachelor of Science Degree in Zoology and Psychology in 1968, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy Degree from the University of Hull in 1973, where he studied aggression in animals. Subsequently, he studied at the University of Pennsylvania in the USA and began research on the behavior of dogs and cats, again with a particular interest in their social and aggressive behavior.

After 9 years' full time research with Mars Inc. who manufacture pet foods, Roger began an applied referral practice (at The Animal Behaviour Centre, Surrey, UK) to service the needs of veterinary surgeons and their clients having problems with their pets. In the 32 years of this practice, more than 80,000 pets have been seen, in the UK, France and elsewhere.

Dr Mugford is widely known in the veterinary profession and beyond for his work in animal behavioral therapy and is a frequent contributor to International Symposia, books, radio and TV programs about dogs and cats. In particular, he is generally regarded as an authority on aggression in dogs. On several occasions each year, Roger teaches applied animal behavior at veterinary schools such as the 5 British Veterinary Schools, at Hannover, Oslo, Shanghai and Barcelona Vet.Schools.

Dr Mugford has written three books, "Dr. Mugford's Casebook" (Hutchinson 1991) ; "Dog Training the Mugford Way" (Hutchinson 1992) and in 2013 his latest book,” The Perfect Dog” was published by Hamlyn in both N. America and UK.

In addition to his interests in behavior therapy, Roger has invented and commercialised a number of accessories designed to restrain or in other ways improve the behavior of dogs. He is best known for invention of the HALTI headcollar, which was the first of its kind in a new product category. There have been other inventions after the HALTI, such as the CLIX range of training products and more recently important safety accessories for dealing with aggressive dogs : the Pet Corrector sound aerosol and the treat-friendly Baskerville Ultra muzzle.

The Company of Animals was formed in the UK in 1979, but is now represented in over 40 countries. Key markets for their unique training products are across all of Europe ,in Canada, Australia and Japan. In the United States, the company distributed the HALTI via Coastal Pet for almost 20 years, but in 2010 formed a wholly owned LLC subsidiary in Bridgeport Conn. It has seen dramatic growth of all brands in the USA and Roger takes great pleasure in spreading a more gentle and British approach to training dogs in America, where the widespread use of shock collars, choke chains and macho methods still distinguishes the two cultures.    

As founder of "The Company of Animals", Roger has near constant contact with owners, trainers, veterinarians and others whose concern is the welfare or reform of problem pets. Both the Animal Behaviour Centre and the Company of Animals are based upon a farm where a wide variety of domestic species are maintained, some for the purpose of animal-assisted psycho-therapy with disabled and learning-impaired visitors.

Dr Mugford is proud to maintain a link with his Devonshire farming heritage and personally takes care of a herd of 70 Pedigree South Devon cattle, 100 sheep, horses, Llamas and more: Ruxbury Farm is a busy and varied place to find work and pleasure amongst animals.

Roger is a Patron to the charity Dogs for the Disabled and a trustee to the charities Medical Detection Dogs and the Pet Care Trust. This work continues his lifelong interest in the Human Animal Bond and the psychological benefits which follow from the company of animals: thus the inspiration for naming the Company of Animals Ltd! Scientific study of the man-animal relationship remains a key interest of Dr Mugford, together with application of new knowledge to the benefit of all but especially for vulnerable and disadvantaged people.

In the last 25 years, Roger has given evidence as an expert in many British Courts and some overseas on matters concerning animal behavior and animal welfare. More cases have involved dogs than any other species, on topics varying from dogs in murder trials, civil damages from injuries by animals, cruelty prosecutions and many cases brought under legislation intended to control dangerous dogs.

TPR NEWS
Sat Oct 18, 2014
Crew:
Jon Patch - Host
Jillyn Sidlo - The New Barker & Celestial Custom Dog Services / Co Host
Amanda Page - Producer
Zach Budin - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guest:
Dr. Susan Kelleher , host of Dr. K's Exotic ER on NAT GEO WILD will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 10/18/14 at 5 PM EST to discuss her show and upcoming episodes
Dr, Robert Mugford, founder of The Company of Animals and inventor of the Pet Correcto, UK's leading pet psychologist will join Jon and Talkin' Pets on 10/18/14 at 630 PM EST to discuss and give away his product

 

Oakland, CA…On October 25 & 26, Oakland Zoo and Bay Area Science Festival team up for Boo at the Zoo. The Halloween and science themed weekend features a spooky scavenger hunt for kids, costume parade, up-close animal encounters, freaky interactive stations, face painting, and a Wildlife Theater presentation focused on creepy crawly animals. Family friendly activities will take place throughout the Zoo, including a treat table where families can create Halloween goodies for the Zoo’s animals. "Oakland Zoo's Boo at the Zoo is a great way for families to celebrate Halloween in a safe, fun enriching environment,” said Erin Harrison, Senior Manager of Marketing & Events. “From candy consumption to watching animals enjoy pumpkin treats to learning about science in a whole new way, this event has it all - there's something for everyone to enjoy" 

Boo at the Zoo is a day-time opportunity for families to bring out their noble Ninja Turtles, tiny Tinker Bells, precious Princesses, and spectacular Superheroes to an outdoor adventure filled with spooktackular fun. Ghirardelli Chocolate Company is the official chocolate sponsor of Boo at the Zoo – offering sweet samples for the treat bags, which will be located in Oakland Zoo’s Adventure Landing. Boo at the Zoo is open from 10:00am – 3:00pm, with the costume parade taking place at 11:00am & 1:00pm. Admission prices are $11.75 for children/seniors and $15.75 for adults. Parking is $8.00 per car. Boo at the Zoo activities are included with general admission.

Boo at the Zoo’s Daily Details:

  • Spooky Scavenger Hunt: search for clues in the scavenger hunt and receive treat bags.
  • Children in costumes (ages 2-14) receive a free ride ticket.
  • Costume parade at 11:00am and 1:00pm with the Zoo’s mascot, Roosevelt.
  • Wildlife Theater Animal Encounters at 11:30am and 12:15pm.
  • Science stations will feature “Zoombie” animals, monster myths, and sensory skills – touch the foods zoo animals like to eat.
  • Craft Halloween creations for Zoo animals.
  • Meet the Oakland Fire Department.
  • Get batty with festive face painting.

Corporate Sponsors of Boo at the Zoo:

  • Ghirardelli Chocolate Company
  • Bay Area Science Festival
  • KOFY TV
  • KPIX5/KBCW
  • Primal Pet Foods

“Treat” Sponsors of Boo at the Zoo:

  • Annie’s
  • Gimbal’s Fine Candies
  • American Licorice
  • Jelly Belly
  • Clif Bar & Company
  • GoGo Squeeze
  • LARABAR
  • Plum Organics (Jammy Sammy)
  • Safeway
  • Sysco

Local Organizations Attending Boo at the Zoo:

  • Oakland Fire Department
  • Oakland Police Department
  • Bay Area Puma Project
  • Felidae Conservation Fund
  • Primal Pet Foods
  • KOFY TV
  • Nylon Zoo

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO

The Bay Area’s award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid’s activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information please visit our website at www.oaklandzoo.org.

ABOUT BAY AREA SCIENCE FESTIVAL

Oakland Zoo will host a booth at Bay Area Science Festival’s Discovery Day event at AT&T Park on Saturday November 1. The Bay Area Science Festival has collaborated with several esteemed leaders in the corporate and academic worlds to present these and many more events.  Featured sponsors include the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, First Tech Federal Credit Union, the Clorox Company, ThermoFisher Scientific, Autodesk, Bayer and Agilent Technologies. For more information on the festival as a whole and for details on specific events, please visit the BASF website at http://www.bayareascience.org. You can also follow us on Twitter @bayareascience and like us on Facebook: facebook.com/bayareascience.

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NEWS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

IS THERE A NEW DOCTOR IN THE NAT GEO WILD HOUSE? DR. K’S EXOTIC ANIMAL ER JOINS THE WILD FAMILY

New Series Follows the Diverse Challenges Veterinarian Dr. Susan Kelleher Faces at One of South Florida’s Busiest Avian and Exotic Animal Clinics,

Where Patients Range from Guinea Pigs to Primates

Everything but dogs and cats. If it will fit through the door, I’ll treat it!” — Dr. K

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER Premieres Saturday, October 4, at 10 PM ET/PT

on Nat Geo WILD

(Washington, D.C. – July 8, 2014) In Nat Geo WILD’s No. 1 series The Incredible Dr. Pol, viewers peer behind the recovery room curtain to see how veterinarian Jan Pol cares for farm animals and domestic pets in rural Michigan. Further north, they ride along in Dr. Michelle Oakley’s mobile medical clinic to see how she treats sick and injured animals across thousands of square miles of Canadian wilderness in Dr. Oakley: Yukon Vet. Now, in the new series Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER, premiering Saturday, October 4, 2014 at 10 p.m. ET/PT, Nat Geo WILD presents its latest venture in documenting the bizarre, unpredictable and rare medical cases treated at the Broward Avian and Exotic Animal Hospital in South Florida.

Dr. Susan Kelleher, better known as “Dr. K,” owns and operates one of the busiest exotic animal care practices in Florida. “Everything but dogs and cats. If it will fit through the door, I’ll treat it!” is Dr. K’s motto.

With over 18 years of veterinary experience, she has seen it all — rabbits, reptiles, rodents, birds of all shapes and sizes, foxes, ferrets, fish, marsupials and even primates! In this new Nat Geo WILD series, we’ll see her treat a variety of unusual animals, from an egg-bound tortoise to a kinkajou with a breathing problem to an ambiguous bush baby that needs neutering … or spaying. No two days and no two cases are ever the same at the clinic, but one thing is certain: There’s always a whole lot of action coming through the doors!

Flanked by intern Dr. Lauren Thielen and associate Dr. Santiago Diaz, Dr. K and the team tackle the issues of having exotic pets as patients. The worldwide trade in exotic animals is a multibillion-dollar-a-year business with millions of wild animals kept in private possession. Dr. K and her team are committed to educating clients about the facts of the exotic animal trade, and the best way to keep their pets healthy. “I got into this business with the intent to help animals in need. By the time they get to me it is sometimes a matter of life or death, and not right or wrong. My main priority is to ensure animals stay healthy and get the proper care,” said Dr. K.

Animals enter the exotic pet trade from a variety of sources. Some are taken from their native habitat; some are from zoos or menageries; some are sold at auctions or in pet shops; others come from backyard breeders. Additionally, the Internet has dramatically increased the ease with which people can find and purchase wild animals for their private possession.

It’s a constant challenge to diagnose, treat and save these animals that are often in desperate condition when they arrive at the hospital. The surgical team at Dr. K’s office jumps into action when a bunny crashes in the recovery room, performing emergency CPR and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in the hopes of reviving the fluffy pet. They race to the ER when a ferret needs surgery STAT. And they make the tough decisions when there is nothing more that can be done to treat or save a dying animal. The job can be emotionally draining and grueling but also rewarding for these animal loving docs.

Like most offices, “water cooler” talk is prevalent, but at this clinic the topic is less about the weather and more about which animal has the worst urine scent: fox, cougar, alligator, unneutered male ferret or skunk that hasn’t been de-scented? Each episode of Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER shines a light on the personalities and personal lives of this dedicated group of animal care providers. Through good times and bad, this tight-knit group supports each other, advising on medical cases and offering moments of comic relief when needed. 

About Dr. K:

Originally from Buffalo, N.Y., Susan Kelleher, D.V.M., received her bachelor’s degree with a dual chemistry/biology major from Alfred University in 1990 and later completed a veterinary degree at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduating in 1995, she moved to Florida to focus on avian and exotic pet medicine. She spent her first three and a half years working in small animal practices before starting her own animal practice —Broward Avian and Exotic Animal Hospital. In the television series Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER Nat Geo WILD cameras follow the day-to-day challenges Dr. K faces at the clinic, documenting the exotic animals she treats and the unusual medical cases she resolves.

Premiere episodes include:

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER, Bunny Nose Job

Premieres Saturday, October 4, at 10 p.m. ET/PT

One of the most interesting aspects of exotic animal care is the range of different species on the exam table, many of them small with intricate physiology. Today, Dr. K tackles a series of tricky surgeries including a bunny nose job with a precarious power tool entry. Dr. K must carefully calculate measurements to avoid boring a hole into the bunny’s mouth or brain. The doctor also sees a bird with a broken leg that requires a series of tiny pins to stabilize the bone. Birds are notoriously difficult to keep stable under anesthesia, making the surgery even more difficult. Finally, Dr. K removes an overgrown tooth from a prairie dog, and new doctor Lauren Thielen attempts her first rat neuter.

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER, Bad Case of Rotten Eggs

Premieres Saturday, October 11, at 10 p.m. ET/PT

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER takes on a variety of exotic animal cases, including a hedgehog, a corn snake, and an egg bound sulcata tortoise with more than a dozen eggs stuck inside her. Dr. K must quickly perform an intricate surgery to remove more than a dozen eggs from the tortoise. An owner expects to hear the worst when she brings in her corn snake with some discolored scales. Finally, Dr. K has a galago as a patient for the first time! Also known as a bush baby, this one comes in for neutering, but other things become apparent once the surgery begins.

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER, Into The Fox Hole

Premieres Saturday, October 18, at 10 p.m. ET/PT

Exotic animals are different from dogs and cats in many ways including the fact that they often don’t show signs of sickness until they are in grave danger. Dr. K never knows what she’s going to get! She’ll treat Cece, a veiled chameleon who is clearly egg-bound. The only way the eggs are coming out is through surgical intervention. But a veiled chameleon is a very small patient, making the procedure difficult. Dr. K begins surgery, but quickly runs into trouble and asks Dr. Thielen to scrub in. The doctor also sees long-time patient Fletcher, a red lored Amazon, who has a mass in the sinus cavity. She takes Fletcher to surgery for an endoscopy, but quickly realizes that he is too weak to handle the anesthesia. Dr. K also treats a Fennec Fox that seems to have clogged anal glands. Finally, Dr. Thielen must deliver the bad news to the owner of two guinea pigs that they need to go on a diet.

Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER is produced by Spectrum Productions for Nat Geo WILD. Spectrum Productions executive producer is Guy Nickerson and show runner is Lisa Tanzer. For Nat Geo WILD, executive producer is Ashley Hoppin; senior vice president of development and production is Janet Han Vissering; and executive vice president and general manager is Geoff Daniels.

# # #

NAT GEO WILD

For more than 30 years, National Geographic has been the leader in wildlife programming. The networks Nat Geo WILD and Nat Geo WILD HD, launched in 2010, offer intimate encounters with nature’s ferocious fighters and gentle creatures of land, sea and air that draw upon the cutting-edge work of the many explorers, filmmakers and scientists of the National Geographic Society. Part of the National Geographic Channels US, based in Washington, D.C., the networks are a joint venture between National Geographic and Fox Cable Networks. In 2001, National Geographic Channel (NGC) debuted, and 10 years later, Spanish-language network Nat Geo Mundo was unveiled. The Channels have carriage with all of the nation’s major cable, telco and satellite television providers, with Nat Geo WILD currently available in over 58 million U.S. homes. Globally, Nat Geo WILD is available in more than 144 million homes in 140 countries and 28 languages. For more information, visit www.natgeowild.com.

TPR News
Saturday, Oct. 11, the 284th day of 2014.
There are 81 days left in the year.

TPR News
Saturday, Oct. 4, the 277th day of 2014. There are 88 days left in the year

TPR NEWS

Saturday, Sept. 27, the 270th day of 2014. There are 95 days left in the year.

Animals transported to emergency shelter to receive medical attention, treatment

Kendall, Wis.—The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), at the request of the Monroe County Humane Investigator and the Monroe County Sherriff’s Office, is assisting with evidence collection and managing the removal and sheltering of 15 dogs and a parakeet living in an overcrowded mobile home in rural Kendall, Wis. The animals were discovered living among feces, trash and rotting food in a poorly ventilated environment.

As a result of an investigation initiated by Monroe County Humane Investigator Bekah Weitz, a search warrant was executed Thursday morning for the removal of the animals.

“Animal hoarding is a complex issue that can encompass mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns,” said Kyle Held, Midwest regional director of ASPCA Field Investigations and Response. “Many of the dogs were living in filth, and our immediate goal is to transport them to a safe place where they will receive care and treatment by our medical team.”

“We’re pleased to be able to work collaboratively with our Humane Investigator and the ASPCA to remove these animals from this overwhelming situation and help as many of them as possible,” added Detective Lieutenant Ron Rader with the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office.

The dogs—ranging from Chihuahuas to Pomeranians—were living in an overcrowded mobile home and exhibited signs of neglect. They also appeared to be suffering from dental disease and dehydration, among other medical issues. As is common in hoarding situations, most of the dogs were not spayed or neutered. ASPCA responders also discovered deceased animal remains on the property.

“The compromised conditions these animals were living in prompted us to take action,” said Monroe County Humane Investigator Bekah Weitz. “It was clear that intervention was needed to help both the owner and the animals. We couldn’t have done it without such great support from all the agencies involved.”

The dogs are being transported to a temporary shelter at an undisclosed location, where they will receive the care and medical attention they need. Agencies including Texas Humane Heroes in Leander, Texas, have deployed responders to assist the ASPCA with the removal and sheltering of the dogs. Additionally, PetSmart Charities® provided supplies, including pet crates and food to support the rescue operation.

The ASPCA will continue to care for the animals at the temporary shelter until suitable placement options are available.

About the ASPCA® Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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The three-part series, narrated by actor David Tennant, deploys 50 spycams to record many first-time images of penguin behavior

The life of a penguin is not an easy one, but recording the challenges faced by nature’s most devoted parents and their offspring in remote parts of the world was nearly as hard, and only possible due to the placement of spycams in their midst. For nearly a year, filmmakers deployed 50 animatronic cameras disguised as realistic life-size penguins, eggs and rocks to infiltrate the colonies of three very different species:  emperor penguins in Antarctica, rockhopper penguins on the Falkland Islands, and Humboldt penguins in Peru’s Atacama Desert. The resulting footage shows what it is really like to be a penguin from a whole new perspective.

Take a front row seat as they journey to their breeding grounds, raise chicks, dodge predators and return to the sea when Penguins: Spy in the Huddle, A Nature Special Presentation airs on three consecutive Wednesdays, September 24, October 1 and 8, 2014 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After broadcast, the episodes will be available for online streaming at pbs.org/nature.

Series director John Downer (“Earthflight”) and his team filmed 1000 hours of intimate behavior for this project using both animatronic and conventional cameras, footage which was later condensed to three hours for broadcast. Penguins: Spy in the Huddle, A Nature Special Presentation contains a number of notable firsts due to the sheer length of time the production crews spent observing the colonies as well as to the presence of the spycams.

At the cold Antarctic breeding ground of the emperor penguins, emperorcams and eggcams await the arrival of prospective parents. In a humorous sequence, female emperors engage in flipper fights over the more limited pool of potential mates. Even when it’s clear which emperors are officially couples, some female rivals still try to disrupt a pair, sometimes when mating. Later, egg-laying by a female is filmed for the very first time. The footage shows how the mother uses her tail feathers to catch the couple’s single egg while her feet cushion the fall. A dropped egg on the ice would quickly freeze leaving the parents childless.

On the Falkland Islands, rockhoppercams, eggcams and even rockcams capture other firsts, including the underwater arrival of rockhopper penguins battling the stormy South Atlantic seas as they head for dry land. Some rockhoppers are also filmed using mountaineering techniques, rather than hopping, as they struggle to scale the steep rock walls to reach their clifftop nests. On a darker note, pairs that have lost their chicks to predators turn to kidnapping from others in their desperation to find another chick to care for and heated fights ensue.

The shy and rarely-filmed Humboldt of Peru’s Atacama Desert is the only mainland penguin to live in the tropics. At night, low-light Humboldtcams reveal for the first time how hungry vampire bats feed on both adults and chicks while the Humboldts fight back by kicking dirt in their faces. Other sequences show how the penguins maneuver through dangerous booby bird colonies, gangs of fur seals and potentially deadly sea lions to make their way back and forth to their nests from the sea.

With 50 remotely controlled spycams operating in tough environments, there are always mishaps:  losing three eggcams in a blizzard or having a rockhoppercam lose its head in an attack by a jealous mate. But when a predator bird mistakes eggcam for the real thing and flies off with it, viewers are treated to the first aerial of a penguin colony shot by a flying bird. The spycams, which captured many first time events and challenges faced by these dedicated parents and chicks, provide new insights into the study of penguin behavior.

Penguins: Spy in the Huddle, A Nature Special Presentation

Episode 1:  The Journey – airs Wednesday, September 24 at 8 p.m.

Emperor penguins cross a treacherous frozen sea to reach their breeding grounds. Rockhoppers brave the world’s stormiest seas only to come ashore and face a daunting 300-foot cliff, hopping most of the way up. Tropical Humboldt penguins negotiate a gauntlet of dangers to reach their desert burrow nests. The hard work for all the penguins finally pays off when their tiny, vulnerable chicks begin to hatch.

Episode 2:  First Steps – airs Wednesday, October 1 at 8 p.m.

Watched by spycams, newborn emperor penguins in Antarctica are seen walking on their mothers’ feet and taking their own first unsteady steps. On the Falklands, rockhopper chicks meet their unruly and predatory neighbors while eggcams provide unique views of the colony. In Peru, Humboldt chicks take on fur seals and take aim at gulls.

Episode 3:  Growing Up – airs Wednesday, October 8 at 8 p.m.

As their chicks become increasingly independent, emperor and rockhopper parents place them in a crèche and go fishing. Humboldt chicks are left in their burrows as the adults head for the beach. As the young grow bigger and preen out baby fluff they sport punk hairdos. Emperor chicks go skating while rockhopper chicks practice jumping skills. Eventually all the chicks leave for the sea, tackling the same hazards as their parents before them, from sea lions to predatory birds, high cliffs to glaciers.

A two-hour version of this three-hour series, titled “Penguins: Waddle All the Way,” aired on Discovery Channel last November.

Nature is a production of THIRTEEN Productions LLC for WNET.  For Nature, Fred Kaufman is executive producer. Penguins: Spy in the Huddle, A Nature Special Presentation is produced by John Downer Productions for BBC.

Nature pioneered a television genre that is now widely emulated in the broadcast industry.  Throughout its history, Nature has brought the natural world to millions of viewers.  The series has been consistently among the most-watched primetime series on public television. 

Nature has won over 700 honors from the television industry, the international wildlife film communities and environmental organizations, including 12 Emmys and three Peabodys. The series received two of wildlife film industry’s highest honors: the Christopher Parsons Outstanding Achievement Award given by the Wildscreen Festival and the Grand Teton Award given by the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. Recently, the International Wildlife Film Festival honored Nature executive producer Fred Kaufman with its Lifetime Achievement Award for Media.

PBS.org/nature is the award-winning web companion to Nature, featuring streaming episodes, filmmaker interviews, teacher’s guides and more.

Support for this Nature program was made possible in part by the Arnhold Family in memory of Clarisse Arnhold, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Estate of Elizabeth A. Vernon, the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, the Filomen M. D’Agostino Foundation, Susan Malloy and the Sun Hill Foundation, by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and by the nation’s public television stations.

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*****NEW FALL SEASON 33 PROGRAM LISTINGS ON PAGE 4

About WNETAs New York’s flagship public media provider and the parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21 and operator of NJTV, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to over 5 million viewers each week. WNET produces and presents such acclaimed PBS series as Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend, Charlie Rose and a range of documentaries, children’s programs, and local news and cultural offerings available on air and online. Pioneers in educational programming, WNET has created such groundbreaking series as Get the Math, Oh Noah! and Cyberchase and provides tools for educators that bring compelling content to life in the classroom and at home. WNET highlights the tri-state’s unique culture and diverse communities through NYC-ARTS, Reel 13, NJTV News with Mary Alice Williams and MetroFocus, the multi-platform news magazine focusing on the New York region. WNET is also a leader in connecting with viewers on emerging platforms, including the THIRTEEN Explore iPad App where users can stream PBS content for free.

NEW FALL SEASON 33 PROGRAM LISTINGS

Wednesday, October 15, 8-9 p.m. on PBS

Nature “Animal Misfits” 

Life on earth is incredibly diverse, but it’s not always what you might expect.  Alongside the fastest, strongest, smartest animals are nature’s misfits.  These odd, bizarre and unlikely creatures at first glance seem-ill equipped for survival.  Left at the starting line in the race for life, these are the apparent losers in the story of evolution, yet somehow they still manage to cling to life and in some cases even thrive.  Animal Misfits reveals some surprising details about how evolution really works, demonstrating that all animals are remarkably well-adapted to their chosen way of life.

Wednesday, November 5, 8-9 p.m. on PBS

Nature “A Sloth Named Velcro”

In 2000 in the jungles of Panama, a young journalist, named Ana, has a chance encounter with a tiny orphaned sloth, which she names Velcro.  For nearly two years, the pair is inseparable until finally Ana travels up a remote river to reintroduce Velcro back to the wild.  This is the story Ana's return to Central and South America to see how much has changed since Velcro came into her life.  Sloths, once largely ignored, have become a hot topic of scientific researchers.  New studies are showing that they're not so sloth-like after all, that they have social structures, they move like primates, and that males keep small harems.  Sloth sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers are also springing up throughout the Americas as development displaces these gentle creatures.  Shot on location in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia this is a story of friendship and a growing network of people working to learn more about sloths in order to protect them.

Wednesday, November 19, 8-9 p.m. on PBS

Nature “Invasion of the Killer Whales”

A remarkable new story is unfolding in the Arctic, one that has never been told before.  As the ice shrinks, the polar bear is struggling to survive in a fast melting world. Polar bears are great hunters on ice but recently their home ground is vanishing from under their feet. Although classified as a marine mammal, the polar bear is not adapted to hunting in the water despite being able to swim huge distances. And they are certainly no match for the world’s greatest aquatic hunter – the killer whale.  In the last few years scientists have started noting an ever-growing number of killer whales in Arctic waters in the summer months.  More and more have been attracted to these huge hunting grounds by the growing expanses of open water.  And they are attacking exactly the same prey animals as the polar bears: seals, narwhal, belugas and bowhead whales. 

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(Sept. 16, 2014)—Elephants in Ezemvelo KwaZulu Natal Wildlife’s Ithala Game Reserve, located on South Africa’s east coast, were treated for the first time with a contraceptive vaccine to control the population’s growth rate.

With the addition of Ithala’s population, immunocontraception now is being used to successfully control elephant populations in 19 parks and reserves, including Tembe Elephant Park, (commenced in 2007) and the uMkhuze section of iSimangaliso Wetland Park in South Africa. Another population in KwaZulu Natal—Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park—also will receive their first vaccination later this year.  

In total, four populations will receive three years of treatment under an agreement between Ezemvelo KwaZulu Natal Wildlife, iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority and Humane Society International. Ezemvelo, HSI and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service are funding the program through the African Elephant Conservation Fund.

Audrey K. Delsink, HSI’s field director of the Elephant Contraception Program in South Africa, said: “We are very pleased to be working with Ezemvelo’s Ithala project. We hope that more elephant managers will fully embrace and use this technology to control elephant population growth in a proactive, effective and humane manner.”

The immunocontraception vaccine contains agents that, when injected into African elephant cows, causes an immune response that prevents eggs from being fertilized. The vaccine is delivered remotely by dart gun, making the technique minimally invasive and eliminating the need for anaesthetization. Immunocontraception is a non-hormonal form of contraception that is based on the scientific principles of immunization through vaccination.

Although elephant poaching and trafficking in ivory severely threatens the survival of African elephants in several African states, in South Africa poaching remains fairly low. The immunocontraceptive program allows elephant populations to be managed humanely, especially in small enclosed parks and private conservancies, to slow their growth rates so as to prevent loss of biodiversity, to maintain ecosystem function and resilience, to reduce harm to human lives or livelihoods, and to avoid compromising key management objectives.

Research conducted over the past 18 years has resulted in a robust body of scientific work demonstrating that immunocontraception is a safe and effective way to control elephant population growth that has no effect on behavior. It is also reversible, allowing managers to fine-tune population growth.

HSI and its affiliate, The Humane Society of the United States, have funded cutting edge research on the use of immunocontraception in African elephants since 1996. Use of immunocontraception is a preferable alternative to other, more expensive, difficult and inhumane population control methods such as culling or capture and translocation which, ultimately, do not solve the problem because populations reactively increase as remaining elephants continue to reproduce.

Read more about immunocontraception of elephants here.

About HSI: Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 20 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide—on the Web at hsi.org.

About Ezemvelo: Ezemvelo is the conservation authority for the province of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. The organisation has been in existence for over 100 years and is mandated to conserve and manage the biodiversity of the KZN province. There are 100 protected areas and Ezemvelo strives to provide a high standard conservation and eco-tourism product – www.kznwildlife.com 

 About iSimangaliso: The iSimangaliso Wetland Park was listed as South Africa’s first World Heritage Site in December 1999 in recognition of its superlative natural beauty and unique global values. Since its inception, 12 years ago the changes affected by the iSimangaliso team have revitalized the tourism industry of the area- www.iSimangaliso.com

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