A black bear in Colorado Springs steals restaurant Dumpsters specifically to feast on the leftovers. In Cape Town, a baboon breaks into homes, raiding kitchens for human food. A coyote makes itself comfortable in the drink cooler of a downtown Chicago Quizno’s sandwich shop. Shouldn’t these animals be roaming free—in the wild, far away from urban centers? So-called “wild” animals are gravitating toward populated areas—spaces we tend to think of as a realm apart from nature. In reality, cities— possibly the most exciting, most surprising, and least understood ecosystems on the planet—are intertwined with natural environments. And just as shifting from country to city living changed humans, cities may be changing the animals that end up living within their loose confines.

In Feral Cities: Adventures with Animals in the Urban Jungle (Chicago Review Press, April 2015) author Tristan Donovan digs below the urban gloss to uncover the stories of wildlife—from tiny bugs to migratory birds to foreboding cougars—that share our sidewalks, streets, and homes. Donovan’s travels and research with experts in Brooklyn, Chicago, Phoenix, Miami, Mumbai, and elsewhere offer a journalistic look at urban wildlife, introducing curious city dwellers and animal lovers to the wall-eating snails that are invading Miami, the wild boars that roam Berlin and the parrots of Brooklyn. From carpet-hungry bugs in Raleigh to the cockroaches of New York City, the tales in Feral Cities explore streets and homes that are far more alive than we often realize, show how animals are adjusting to urban living, and ask what the wildlife in our metropolises—and our response to it—says about us.

Revealing that urban life isn’t always as bad for animals as you might think, Feral Cities explores how cities are becoming distinct ecological communities and illuminates the mindset of city inhabitants and urban wildlife experts as well as actions of the animals themselves.

TPR News
Sat Mar 21, 2015Crew:
Jon Patch - Host
Jillyn Sidlo - Co Host
Lexi Lapp - Producer
Zach Budin - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guests:
Dr. Scott Sims will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/21/15 at 5 PM EST to discuss his NAT GEO WILD show Maverick Vet Goes Wild - Aloha Vet Series
Joe and Shelley from Pet Tree Houses will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/21/15 at 635 PM EST to discuss their Pet Tree Houses and give away a Pet Tree Scratching Post valued at over one hundred dollars
Steve Pahl from Tampa Bay Emergency Vet Clinic at 7 PM EST to discuss JUSTICE FOR CABELA: Maximum punishment for men who shot an innocent dog and tied her down to railroad tracks---------------------

MAVERICK VET GOES WILD

NAT GEO WILD’S NEW ALOHA VET SERIES IS A

PACIFIC ISLAND ANIMAL ADVENTURE

Island Hop with Hawaii’s Best Known Veterinarian, Dr. Scott Sims,

As He Treats Animals On The Go

Aloha Vet Premieres Saturday, March 21, 9 PM ET/PT on Nat Geo WILD

(WASHINGTON, D.C. – Jan. X, 2014) Dr. Scott Sims is one of Hawaii’s best-kept local secrets. He’s known as the Barefoot Vet and he’s not your typical veterinarian. Dr. Sims treats both wild and domestic animals, and when islanders need help with their pets, he’s the one they call. Some clients live in hard to reach locations, but if an animal is hurt Dr. Sims always finds a way to get there, even if he has to walk, ride a horse, drive an ATV, fly a plane, or swim. It’s a wild job that’s an adventure every day. The new series Aloha Vet premieres on Saturday, March 21, at 9 p.m. ET/PT, on Nat Geo WILD (For more information on Aloha Vet, visit www.natgeowild.com and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/NGC_PR).

Nat Geo WILD cameras follow Dr. Sims through his busy days as the main local veterinarian in Kauai. His phone never stops ringing, his hours are long and he rarely gets a full night of sleep. With a heart of gold, Dr. Sims will help any animal that can walk, crawl, fly or swim.

While Dr. Sims is a vet who treats all animals big and small, it’s quite often in unusual places. In this series, he rescues a sea turtle caught in fishing line, saves an unconscious horse stuck in a river bed, and brings sight back to a pig blinded for years.

His workplace puts him in the unique position to help domestic and wild animals all over the island. In one week he’ll care for a variety of animals including horses, dogs, cats, goats, birds, reptiles, fish, and sea turtles.

Whether he’s performing procedures on mountaintops, near waterfalls, on secluded beaches, or on the tailgate of a truck, one thing is certain: the animals are in good hands. Follow the Aloha Vet as he ventures across the rural islands of Hawaii, doing whatever it takes to help all creatures great and small.

Aloha Vet is produced by Shine America for Nat Geo WILD. Shine America executive producers are Eden Gaha and Mike Aho. For Nat Geo WILD, executive producer is Tracy Rudolph; senior vice president of development and production is Janet Han Vissering; and executive vice president and general manager is Geoff Daniels.

# # #

About Nat Geo WILD

Experience the best, most intimate encounters with wildlife ever seen on television. Backed by its unparalleled reputation for quality and blue-chip programming, Nat Geo WILD is dedicated to providing a unique insight into the natural world, the environment and the amazing creatures that inhabit it. From the most remote environments, to the forbidding depths of our oceans, to the protected parks on our doorsteps, Nat Geo WILD will use spectacular cinematography and compelling storytelling to take viewers on unforgettable journeys into the wild world. Launched in 2006, Nat Geo WILD is part of National Geographic Channels International (NGCI) and is available in more than 90 countries and 100 million homes. Nat Geo WILD HD launched in the U.K. in March 2009, and is also available in Greece, Latin America, Poland, Spain and Russia. Further expansion is expected globally. For more information, please visit www.natgeotv.com.

Pet Tree Houses:  About Us 
From a custom home builder of million dollar homes and a wife with a passion for animals - to master crafters of feline habitats.   Joe and Shelley DelRocco designed their first Pet Tree House for their own cats in 2008.  The premise was twofold:  to create an aesthetically pleasing feline tree house and a tree that the cats would actually use  and would be a realistic outdoor experience for them making them feel more at home in their natural environment.  
Joe and Shelley have spent years perfecting the engineering of the tree house and continue to strive to exceed their customers’ expectations.  Each tree is hand crafted and takes up to 1,000 individual cuts to build it.  The real trees are hand selected as is the cedar to provide the highest quality indoor habitats available today.
Some of our top beneficiaries include 
Seminole County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals * Orange County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals * Candy’s Cats * Hollywood Houndz * Pet Rescue By Judy * 
Starting in their garage, Joe and Shelley’s business grew in popularity and demand.  Taking a leap of faith, Joe left his custom home business and he and Shelley opened a manufacturing plant and showroom in Sanford, Florida.   Pet Tree Houses quickly became a well-known brand throughout the cat industry across the United States and abroad.
Our Mission is Simple
To use our God-given gifts to help the animals and support our local SPCA’s and animal rescue groups building a business that distinguishes the Pet Tree Houses brand on customer appreciation, uncompromised quality, honesty and integrity.
We are committed to producing the highest level of quality indoor feline habitats to our customers, which distinguishes the Pet Tree Houses brand in the marketplace.  Equally important is our dedication to supporting our local community SPCA and animal rescue groups.  We recognize the value of contributing to the growth of our community in order for our business to prosper. To that end, Pet Tree Houses is proud to support organizations that are dedicated to saving and rescuing animals in our community while creating hope for a brighter future for our pets.
Contact Information:
Pet Tree Houses 1290 Tropic Park Drive, Sanford, FL 32773 877-971-8733 toll free www.PetTreeHouses.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

TPR PREP
 3.14.15  -  Pi Day
The only year until 2115 that at 3/14/15, 9:26:53, is an exact match for pi's first 10 digits. Crew
Jon Patch - Host
Barry Siebold - Vet Tech/Co Host
Amanda Page - Producer
Zack Budin - Network Producer
Bob Page - Executive Producer
Special Guest - hour 1 - David FitzSimmons, writer, photographer, Curious Critters Marine will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/14/15 at 5 PM EST to discuss and give away his book

Rescue team catches circus after public tip off

MARCH 13, 2015, Piura, Peru - Animal Defenders International (ADI) and Peruvian authorities SERFOR, ATFFS, the National Police and department of Piura have successfully raided an illegal circus today, rescuing three lionesses and two monkeys as part of a collaborative effort to enforce the country’s ban on the use of wild animals in circuses.

ADI has now removed 24 lions from Peruvian circuses and has in its care almost seventy animals rescued during ADI's Operation Spirit of Freedom.

ADI urged members of the public to be vigilant for any circuses defying the law.  Following a tip off, ADI has been trailing the circus for over a week while liaising with the authorities in preparation for today's seizure.

Early this morning the circus suddenly moved with vehicles leaving in different directions but thanks to an ADI team the vehicle with the animals was stopped just outside Sullana, just north of Piura.

The three lionesses called Africa, Kiara and Muneca, and two monkeys, Valeria and Valentino, are on their way to the ADI Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue center near Lima, where they will join the 21 lions, 31 monkeys and other wild animals who have been saved from circuses and the illegal wildlife trade during the groundbreaking rescue mission.  A further nine lions are in ADI's custody in Colombia.

ADI will be relocating all of the animals to their permanent homes in the coming weeks. Native wildlife will be rehomed in jungle habitats, which are being constructed by ADI in the Peruvian rainforest, at Pilpintuwasi in Iquitos and IkamaPeru. A total of 33 lions, including 9 from a circus in Colombia, will fly on the biggest airlift of its kind to The Wild Animal Sanctuary in the US.

ADI President Jan Creamer said “The ADI mission has always been to ensure no animals are left behind.  We are elated to have saved these animals today and they will get their chance of a new life on the ADI Spirit of Freedom flight.  We will remain vigilant.  There should be no wild animals in circuses so if anyone sees one - they should call ADI."

Jan continued: "this is a historic day for Peru as ADI, SERFOR, the ATFFS and police have shown wild animal acts have no place in modern society and will not be tolerated."

The ban on the use of wild animals in circuses in Peru was secured after a five-year campaign by ADI and Peru's animal protection groups, following its shocking two-year investigation of South American circuses. The investigation led to five national bans on wild animals in circuses in Latin America - worldwide 30 countries have banned wild animal acts.

Efforts by ADI to stop circus suffering in Peru and enforce the law have been  supported by the public and local animal organizations including United for Animals (UPA), Amazon Shelter, Peruvian Association of Animal Protection (ASPPA) and Animals Without Borders (ASF).

ADI is funding all rescue operations in Peru and the huge cost of relocating the animals - the largest single cost will be the flight to the USA.

Jan Creamer:  "This is a wonderful day but it meant bringing our rescue team and trucks loaded with cages up to Piura.  Tonight our precious cargo will be traveling back to Lima where we will have five more mouths to feed and three more travel crates to build.  We urge people to please donate to help this mission.
 
http://www.ad-international.org/FreedomAppealUS

Peru’s ban on wild animals in circuses was passed in 2012 following a successful campaign by ADI and local animal protection groups, following a two-year undercover investigation by ADI which revealed widespread suffering of circus animals across South America. The shocking exposé led to calls for action and nationwide bans followed in Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador and El Salvador.  

Operation Spirit of Freedom was launched in August 2014 with ADI providing complete logistical support to the Peruvian authorities and removing wild animals from circuses all over Peru.  21 lions are in ADI’s care at their temporary Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue center near Lima. ADI has also begun assisting the Colombian authorities with implementation of its wild animal circus ban and is caring for nine lions who will join the Peruvian lions on the flight to the US.   

Legendary, award-winning TV host Bob Barker donated $500,000 to get the rescue mission underway and establish the temporary holding center in Peru.   

ADI estimates that construction of all the habitats for the indigenous wildlife, their care whilst they are constructed, and the cost to relocate the animals, will require $60-80,000 – and possibly more because of the diversity of species.  

Approximately $200,000 is needed for the relocation of the lions from Peru and Colombia.  

National restrictions on performing animals in travelling circuses, either wild, all animals, or in a handful of cases specific species have been enacted in 30 countries – Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Malta, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Slovenia, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands. Similar laws are under discussion in the UK, USA, Brazil and Chile.   

Animal Defenders International  
www.ad-international.org
With offices in London, Los Angeles and Bogota, ADI campaigns across the globe on animals in entertainment, providing technical advice to governments, securing progressive animal protection legislation, drafting regulations and rescuing animals in distress. ADI has a worldwide reputation for providing video and photographic evidence exposing the behind-the-scenes suffering in industry and supporting this evidence with scientific research on captive wildlife and transport. ADI rescues animals all over the world, educates the public on animals and environmental issues.

Children Go Face-to-Face with a Giant Pacific Octopus!

Wildlife photographer and environmental educator David FitzSimmons is on a mission to get children to fall in love with animals of the ocean by making reading as engaging and educational as a swim in the sea. His new book, Curious Critters Marine, the third book in his popular Curious Critters series, is being released on April 22, Earth Day 2015. And it’s bound to make a splash!

FitzSimmons is at the forefront of environmental education. He produces exquisitely-detailed, up-close photography of amazing animals that inhabit the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, as well as the Gulf of Mexico. Through stunning photography, children go face-to-face with animals ranging from a spectacular spoonbill to an incredible blue lobster, from a tufted puffin to an upside-down jellyfish, and from a baby sea turtle to a giant Pacific octopus.

Children are mesmerized as they stare eye-to-eye with a crab, a cormorant, or an octopus. I try to photograph the animals on eye-level so kids can connect emotionally with the critters,” said FitzSimmons. “The goal is to foster children’s biophilia—to get young readers to fall in love with nature.”

And fall in love they do—with a cadre of curious animals. “Up to ninety percent of kids’ dreams are about animals. My books allow children to experience nature, particularly animals, through reading,” said FitzSimmons. “Of course, peering at a sea star in a tidal pool or hearing a cormorant call along the coast are great ways for children to connect with nature. But these experiences should be supplemented with nature reading.”

Adding to the fun photography is playful prose accompanying each critter. As the animals posed for portraits, David imagined them talking to him. Then he wrote down what they had to say.

The cushion sea star, for example, serenades readers with stanzas set to “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”

Look at me, a bright sea star,

out beyond the big sand bar.

Crawling in the shallow sea,

tiny tube feet carry me

out to join a galaxy

of sea stars that look like me.

A crabby calico crab bemoans his thankless role as a detritivore: “I’m the one down here devouring loads of decaying debris, and nobody applauds my efforts. Without recyclers like me, can you imagine what the ocean would look like? Why, we’d be wallowing in whale waste and covered in crumbling kelp.”

The tufted puffin revels in romance : “I love getting all dressed up—putting on my best black feathers, brightening up my bill, and growing two feather plumes—all for my lovely lady.”

And an agile gray angelfish waxes poetic about life on the reef:

Swim so happily angelfish.

Give you little fins a swish.

Twist and turn within the reef.

Nibble sponges with your teeth.

Other creatures also offer their insights into marine world. The spike-covered Atlantic horseshoe crab explains that a sharp shell has allowed this spider-relative to survive since “long before dinosaurs were around.” A baby loggerhead sea turtle tiredly talks about his march from nest to sea after hatching. And the blue American lobster points out that, while most of his crustacean compatriots are “brown or dark green,” he is a rare “one-in-two-million blue gem of the sea.”

With mesmerizing images and inviting prose, Curious Critters Marine is sure to whet the appetite of young children wishing to know more about North America’s salty waters. Additional material in the back of the book includes a Life-Size Silhouettes page, a Glossary, and a Natural History page, where readers learn that Atlantic horseshoe crabs have blue blood, that tufted puffins may carry up to sixty fish in their beaks at once, and that California sea cucumbers eat with their mouths and their rear ends!

FitzSimmons points out that oceans cover more than seventy percent of the Earth’s surface, yet humans have explored less than five percent of their waters. He believes that Curious Critters Marine may act as “a snorkel, fins, and mask,” allowing readers of all ages to “dive in!”

With Curious Critters Marine, you will find a wet and wonderful world awaits you.

Curious Critters Marine

by David FitzSimmons

List $16.95

Hardcover, Color illustrations throughout, 11 in. x 9.5 in., 32 pp.

ISBN 978-1-936607-72-3

Published by Wild Iris Publishing

Official Publication date April 22, 2015 (Earth Day)

Children’s Nonfiction (Ages 2-8).

www.curious-critters.com displays more Curious Critters photos and provides information about how FitzSimmons photographed the animals, as well as insight about how he write his books.

Curious Critters Volume One has sold over 100,000 copies and won six national book awards, including the coveted Independent Book Publishers Association’s Bill Fisher Award for Best First Book.

About the Author -- DAVID FITZSIMMONS

David FitzSimmons is an award-winning free-lance photographer and writer. David photographs and writes for various magazines, including Outdoor Photographer, Popular Photography, ProfessionalPhotographer, and Shutterbug. His 100+ calendar credits include numerous titles by BrownTrout and Barnes & Noble. David’s most recent publications include Animals of Ohio’s Ponds and Vernal Pools, Curious Critters, which has won five national book awards and sold over 100,000 copies to-date, and Curious Critter Volume Two, as well as audiobooks for both Curious Critters titles. Forthcoming is Salamander Dance (Spring 2016), a children’s picture book exploring the annual life cycle of vernal pools, and the first two board books, Curious Critters Ohio and Curious Critters Michigan.

One of seven Sigma Pro photographers in North America, David presents seminars and workshops to a wide variety of audiences, from public school, college, and university classes to photography groups and civic organizations. His works have been exhibited at the Roger Tory Peterson Institute, the National Center for Nature Photography, and the Telluride Photo Festival.

Before becoming a freelance photographer and author, David taught for over twenty years, first as high school English teacher and then as a university professor, having instructed at Ashland University, Ohio State University, and Cornell University. He holds a Ph.D. in English from Ohio State, with a specialty in narrative theory—investigating the components of storytelling—something that influences his photography and writing.

Learn more about David at www.fitzsimmonsphotography.com

Bird Conservation Group Calls for Changes in Collection of Data at Wind Developments

MEDIA RELEASE

(Washington, D.C., March 6, 2015) American Bird Conservancy (ABC) has called on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to institute a new system of pre-construction risk assessment and bird and bat mortality data collection in connection with hundreds of thousands of bird (and bat) deaths being caused by wind turbines and the likelihood that that number could substantially exceed one million deaths when the industry reaches its full build out capacity by 2030 or before.

The ABC proposal was made in a letter to Department of Interior and FWS pursuant to their request for comments on information collection in connection with their land-based wind energy guidelines. It follows the entering of a guilty plea on January 6 from PacifiCorp that will require the company to pay $2.5 million in fines, restitution and community service for violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act by killing 38 Golden Eagles and 336 other birds at two Wyoming wind farms.

ABC is asking FWS to institute a pre-construction risk assessment and bird mortality data collection that are based on:

  1. studies conducted by independent, qualified experts selected by the FWS or a trusted consulting company hired by FWS;
  2. costs being borne by wind energy companies;
  3. all reports sent directly to the FWS, and not through the wind energy company, which would then have no opportunity to edit or alter the reports to their advantage;
  4. reports being made available to the public to add an additional layer of scrutiny; and
  5. mandatory requirement to conduct independent Environmental Assessments (EA) and obtain incidental take permits under the Endangered Species Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act when protected species are present.

The ABC letter commended the FWS for formally recognizing, in their comment solicitation, that there may be serious problems with their current voluntary system of siting and operational guidelines for the wind industry, which is based largely on self-reporting.  The solicitation said that: “We are currently in the process of evaluating the efficacy and use of the Guidelines and the Service is considering regulatory options. Based on feedback from the wind energy industry and from Service staff, the Guidelines are often successful in improving communication and lead to development of wind projects that are safer for wildlife, but in other cases are not successful in preventing wind energy facilities from being constructed in areas of high risk to wildlife.”

ABC objected to the statement “often successful,” asserting that there are no data to support such a statement. ABC is calling on FWS to “trust but verify” in regard to bird mortality data collection and monitoring, citing a wide range of problems with the current system, including:

  1. industry-paid consultants that downplay the potential impact of wind energy facilities on federally-protected birds and bats during the Environmental Assessment development process;
  2. attempts by the wind industry to site wind energy in highly sensitive areas for birds (e.g., Mill Creek in Missouri, Camp Perry in Ohio, Apple Blossom in Michigan, etc.);
  3. industry-paid consultants who collect data on post-construction fatalities and report unverified and potentially incorrect data to regulators;
  4. lack of fatality reporting by existing wind energy facilities; and
  5. efforts to hide bird and bat fatality data from the public. 

The ABC letter charges that “…wind energy companies should not be collecting their own fatality data, as it is a direct conflict of interest.  Industry does not share mortality data with the public and FWS contends that the data are owned by the companies.  ABC contends they only ‘own’ the data because of the system that FWS has set up, which is based entirely on self-reporting.”

ABC had additional concerns with current federal plans to have the American Wind and Wildlife Institute (AWWI) retain bird and bat mortality data. Under that plan, AWWI would sign a confidentiality agreement with wind energy companies and would not be subject to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. “This seems like a less-than-veiled attempt to continue to keep the public and concerned NGOs in the dark,” said Dr. Michael Hutchins, National Coordinator of ABC’s Bird Smart Wind Energy Campaign and author of the letter.

#

American Bird Conservancy is the Western Hemisphere’s bird conservation specialist—the only organization with a single and steadfast commitment to achieving conservation results for native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With a focus on efficiency and working in partnership, we take on the toughest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on sound science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation.

 

TPR Prep

Crew:

Jon Patch - Host

Dr. Jarrod Lazarus DVM - CoHost

Zach Budin - Network Producer

Bob Page - Executive Producer

Special Guest:

Debbye Turner Bell, DVM, Former Miss America will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 3/7/15 at 5 PM EST to discuss National Puppy Day

Debbye Turner Bell

BIO

 

Dr. Debbye Turner Bell’s first passion is motivational speaking. Since being crowned Miss America in 1990, Turner Bell has spoken to millions of students at countless schools, youth organizations and college campuses. She has addressed audiences in the corporate, academic, and community service arenas. Her topics include personal excellence, determination, goal setting and the importance of a solid education. Turner Bell’s beliefs reflect her own life-lessons – it took seven years and eleven tries in two states before she was crowned Miss America.

Turner Bell can be seen as an expert contributor to the show DOGS 101 on Animal Planet. For 11 years, Turner Bell enjoyed her role in broadcast journalism as a staff correspondent for CBS News starting in 2001. She covered a variety of subjects, and was from time to time called upon to cover breaking and developing news.  Turner Bell was dubbed The Early Show's resident veterinarian sharing a wealth of advice about quality pet care. In 2002, Debbye garnered an interview with President & Mrs. Bush at the White House for a Pet Planet segment about the first family’s pets. Periodically she reported for the CBS Evening News.  And she provided an in-depth look at the working dogs of the federal agency, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) for CBS Sunday Morning.  Turner Bell hosted a prime time television magazine program called "48 Hours on WE."  Prior to joining CBS, she co-hosted a local television magazine program called "ShowMe St. Louis."

Over the last 23 years, Turner Bell has found time to serve on many local, state and national boards, including the National Council on Youth leadership, Children's Miracle Network, Missouri Division of Youth Services and Mathews-Dickey Boys and Girls Club, and the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council, which is an advisory council to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which is an institute in the National Institutes of Health.

Turner Bell graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia in May 1991 with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture in May 1986 from Arkansas State University. Turner Bell lives in the New York City area with her husband and daughter.

Gregory Castle

CEO and Co-founder, Best Friends Animal Society

 

Gregory Castle is a co-founder of Best Friends Animal Society and currently chief executive officer. Born and raised in England, Gregory is a graduate of Cambridge University with a master’s degree in philosophy and psychology. After his studies, Gregory began a short stint in filmmaking before linking up with many of the individuals who would become his fellow co-founders of Best Friends Animal Society.  

 

Even before they founded Best Friends Animal Society, animals were an important part of the equation for the co-founders. The group campaigned against animal testing and began looking for a home in the red-rock canyons of southern Utah where they could care for abandoned and abused animals. Gregory was one of the first on-site in Angel Canyon to set up what would become the largest animal sanctuary in the nation and the flagship of the no-kill movement. Without formal training in construction and armed only with a few “how to” books, Gregory was initially responsible for doing all of the electrical and plumbing work.

 

Gregory is a recognized leader in animal welfare and a voice of reason and reconciliation among grassroots rescue groups, animal shelters and national animal organizations. Gregory is responsible for the creation of No More Homeless Pets in Utah, which evolved into No-Kill Utah, a Best Friends-led coalition of animal welfare and rescue organizations and animal lovers collaborating to deliver aggressive spay/neuter, adoption and public awareness programs to help the state’s homeless pets. Gregory’s efforts have fundamentally changed the state of animal welfare in Utah, which is currently on a trajectory to become a no-kill state by 2019.

 

Gregory lives in Kanab with his wife, Julie Castle, chief development and marketing officer of Best Friends Animal Society, and his family of pets.

 

BACKGROUND:

 

At Nature’s Variety, we believe dogs and cats should live healthy, happy lives. It’s core to our company purpose of empowering people to transform the lives of pets®.  Best Friends Animal Society is an animal welfare  organization  with  a  goal  to  end  the  unnecessary  killing  of  adoptable  dogs  and  cats  in  animal shelters. And now, Nature’s Variety and Best Friends Animal Society are excited to announce the launch of Long Live Pets and begin an exclusive partnership.

 

LONG LIVE PETS

LongLivePetsisamultifacetedcampaigndesignedtoeducatethepublicaboutsavingthelivesof thousandsofshelterpetsandencouragepeopletoadoptapet.

 

Shockingly,anestimatedseventoeightmillionpetsentersheltersandrescueseachyear.Threeto  fourmillionofthesepets,whoarebeautifulandadoptable,arekilledinthosesheltersduetolackofspace.Thisequatestoabout9,000petseverysingleday.

LongLivePetswillraiseawarenessofthe scale of this issue and inspire people to takeaction.

 

As the first part of our Long Live Pets campaign, we’re inviting pet lovers to join us in the creationofaninspiringshortfilmcelebratingthefirstdayinthenewlifeofarescueddog.Ownersof  adoptedorrescueddogsareinvitedtosubmitphotosoftheirrescuesatLongLivePets.comto be included in thefilm.

 The film will be used to inspire thousands more to join the no-kill movement by adopting a pet, volunteering, or making a donation. Submit photos now through March 31,2015.
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