TPR NEWS
Saturday, July 19, the 200th day of 2014.
There are 165 days left in the year.

TPR NEWS - July 12, 2014
TIH
1979, a Chicago disc jockey held a "disco demolition" between a baseball doubleheader at Comiskey Park. The second game was called off because so much damage had been done to the field. More than 50,000 fans packed the stadium that day. They say this event started the deline of disco.

How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves

By

Laurel Braitman

Simon & Schuster | Hardcover | On Sale June 10, 2014

Science historian and senior TED fellow Braitman takes measure of the emotional thunderstorms that cramp or even curtail the normal lives of animals….There is much here that will remind readers of Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson—a gift for storytelling, strong observational talents, an easy familiarity with the background material and a warm level of empathy….Engaging….Sparks curiosity.”Kirkus Reviews

Illuminating….Braitman’s delightful balance of humor and poignancy brings each case to life….[Animal Madness’s]continuous dose of hope should prove medicinal for humans and animals alike.”

Publishers Weekly

This is a marvelous, smart, eloquent book—as much about human emotion as it is about animals and their inner lives.” — Susan Orlean, bestselling author of Rin Tin Tin, Saturday Night, and The Orchid Thief

Braitman shows us sides of the animal mind few have imagined, and in doing so, opens our eyes anew.”

Virginia Morell, author of Animal Wise

" Laurel Braitman deftly and elegantly makes the case that animals have complex emotional lives. This passionate, provocative, and insightful book deeply expands our knowledge and empathy for all species—especially, perhaps, our own.” — Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, M.D. and Kathryn Bowers, Co-authors: Zoobiquity: Astonishing Connections Between Human and Animal Health

"ANIMAL MADNESS is the sanest book I've read in a long time. Laurel Braitman irrefutably shows that animals think and feel, and experience the same emotions that we do. To deny this is crazy—which is why this fine book should be required reading for anyone who cares about healing the broken inner lives of both people and animals." — Sy Montgomery, author of Good Good Pig

Braitman assembles the shattered pieces of others’ minds into a thoroughly considered and surprising realization that many familiar animals possess the same mental demons that haunt us. This insight challenges us to accept that our ancient kinship with other animals is as apparent in our psyche as it is in our physique.”  — John Marzluff, author of Gifts of the Crow

Humane, insightful, and beautifully written, Animal Madness gives anthropomorphism a good name. Laurel Braitman’s modern and nuanced definition of the word helps animals, helps people, and bolsters the connection between the two. Her thought-provoking book illuminates just how much we share with the creatures around us.” —Vicki Constantine Croke, author of The Lady and the Panda

Only a writer as earnestly curious as Laurel Braitman—so irrepressibly game to understand the animal mind—could draw this elegantly on both the findings of academic scientists and the observations of a used elephant salesman in Thailand; on the sorrows of a famous, captive grizzly bear in nineteenth-century San Francisco and the anxieties of her own dog. Animal Madness is a big-hearted and wildly intelligent book..” —Jon Mooallem,author of Wild Ones

Researchers have long ignored animals in need, especially in the wild. However, just as we suffer from a wide variety of psychological disorders so too do other animals. But they make a remarkable recovery when they are cared for, understood, and loved.” —Marc Bekoff, author of Why Dogs Hump and Bees Get Depressed and editor of Ignoring Nature No More

 _____________________________________________________________________________

Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay Archipelago. Laurel Braitman’s lessons started closer to home—by observing her pet’s odd behavior. When Braitman’s anxious but beloved Bernese Mountain dog Oliver jumped out of a third-story window in a fit of panic and nearly died, the germ of what would become Braitman’s life passion began: She would go to the ends of the earth to learn about emotionally disturbed animals and the ways they heal, often observing incredible parallels with human healing. In ANIMAL MADNESS: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves (S&S; June 10, 2014), Braitman shares the fascinating, inspiring stories she uncovered – and comes to the conclusion that humans and many other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to mental illness and recovery.

Braitman’s dog Oliver was the poster canine for disturbing behavior: He snapped at flies that only he could see, ate inedible items like Ziploc bags and towels (well past puppy-dom), and licked and gnawed on himself compulsively. One afternoon, when left alone for only a few hours, Oliver chewed through a metal window screen and leapt from the third floor. He was badly injured but survived. Stunned and confused, Braitman set out to understand what was driving Oliver to such extremes, and if he could be helped. Ultimately she was unable to solve his but along the way she met with dozens of veterinarians, animal behaviorists, neuroscientists, and fellow pet owners; combed through the archives of our country’s oldest natural history museums; and traveled the globe to learn from other people’s unique experiences with animals, such as human psychotherapists with gorilla, bonobo and orangutan patients, and Mexican whale-watching guides who’ve witnessed the emotional recovery of once-violent California gray whales.  Through her research, Braitman discovered a form of continuity between humans and other animals that – first as a biology major and later as a PhD student at MIT – she’d never been taught in school. It turns out that many nonhuman animals, such as obsessive parrots, self-harming dolphins and anxious gorillas, can lose their minds – and when they do, it often looks a lot like human mental illness.

Thankfully, so many of us can heal. During her travels, Braitman heard dozens of moving recovery stories: parrots that learn how to stop plucking their feathers, dogs that cease licking their tails raw, polar bears that stop swimming in compulsive circles, and great apes that benefit from the help of human psychiatrists. How do these animals recover? The same way we do: with love, with medicine, with behavior therapy, and above all, with the knowledge that someone understands why we suffer and what can make us feel better.

With the ground-breaking authority and compassion of a Temple Grandin or Jane Goodall, Laurel Braitman takes us to a new frontier in thinking about animal psychology. ANIMAL MADNESS encourages us to understand and embrace the emotional life we share with animals – both in madness and in healing.

About the Author:

MIT PhD in the history of science, Laurel Braitman has written and performed live for Pop Up Magazine, The New Inquiry, Orion, and a variety of other publications. She is a TED Fellow and an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts. Laurel lives on a houseboat in Sausalito, California, and can be reached at AnimalMadness.com. Follow her on twitter @LaurelBraitman.

ANIMAL MADNESS * by Laurel Braitman * Simon & Schuster Hardcover * On-sale June 10, 2014 * $28

ISBN: 9781451627008 * eBook ISBN: 9781451627022

Born Free USA CEO weighs in on CITES meeting July 7 to 11

Washington, D.C., June 25, 2014 -- Citizens from all 180 nations represented at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will monitor the upcoming deliberations of the CITES Standing Committee in Geneva (July 7 to 11, 2014) where decision-makers and politicians will meet to debate the future of some of the planet’s most threatened species.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA and acting CEO of Born Free Foundation,  “CITES delegates have an amazing opportunity in Geneva to address the issues of endangered species conservation – the startling statistics of the wildlife trade will surely make anyone’s blood run cold.”

Roberts explains, “As many as 50,000 elephants were gunned down for their ivory tusks last year. The horn of a rhinoceros, coveted for its alleged medicinal properties, is fetching $60,000 a kilo on the black-market, leading to unabated slaughter. The demand for tiger body parts is causing population decimation, with just 3,500 remaining in the wild. All of these issues and more require urgent attention from CITES.”

Organized criminal syndicates, money laundering, and corruption mean that tackling the illegal trade in these vulnerable species is highly complex.  Ivory’s Curse, a recent report commissioned by Born Free USA, highlights alarming links between government-led militias, terrorist groups, and elephant poaching. 

Elephants:  “Born Free’s delegation will be calling on CITES to suspend debates about future legalized trade in elephant ivory,” explains Roberts. “Experiments to allow ivory trade in recent years have failed appallingly.  Africa’s elephants are worse off today than ever before. I strongly believe this is  a direct result of the international community’s failure to maintain a strong and comprehensive ban on any ivory trade.  We need proactive measures such as those adopted in the Elephant Protection Initiative; ivory stockpile destruction; investment in enforcement; and  we must demand eradication.”

Asian elephants will be in the spotlight at CITES, with calls for action to be taken against the illegal capture and smuggling of wild-caught infant elephants into the “domestic trade” where they are brutally trained before being touted for unsuspecting tourists to ride. There is an urgent call for domestic laws to be strengthened and enforced to prevent the laundering of illegal animals into the legal marketplace. 

Cheetahs:  Another strong focus for Born Free will be the illegal trade in cheetahs, which are being smuggled live out of the Horn of Africa.  Earlier this year, CITES agreed to organize a multi-stakeholder workshop to address this problem, an initiative that Born Free fully supports.

Tigers:  When it comes to tiger issues at CITES, the problems are all too clear. Roberts says, “Repeated requests for information from governments regarding the measures being taken to address tiger conservation have resulted in inadequate responses, at best.  This has severely hampered further action by CITES, but aside from that it has become patently obvious that tigers captive bred in Thailand, Laos, China and Vietnam are feeding into the illegal domestic and international trade.”

There are now over 6,500 tigers in these horrendous “farms,” supplying a market which in turn fuels further poaching of the world’s remaining 3,500 wild tigers. Once again Born Free will do its utmost to ensure this issue gets priority attention at July’s meeting and that a serious commitment is made, as required, to stockpile destruction and closure of these notorious ‘tiger farms’.

Rhinos:  Another pressing issue remains the plight of wild rhinos, victims of high levels of poaching for their horns. In 2013, over 1,000 rhino were poached in South Africa alone, and so far this year the deadly total has exceeded 440. While the Standing Committee will be considering a number of measures designed to close existing trade loopholes, many, including Born Free, are calling for a complete ban on all trade, including trophies, and the destruction of rhino horn stockpiles.

“CITES has a mammoth task on its hands, and while talk is good, it is now time for resolute action before it’s too late,” says Will Travers OBE, President of Born Free. “We need to give imperiled species such as rhinos, elephants, tigers and cheetahs a fighting chance. For some species the notion that they can, in some way, continue to endure the added pressure of controlled or limited legal trade while numbers continue to plummet is an idea that has lost credibility. The time for experimenting with the exploitation of our natural wildlife heritage is over.  CITES is uniquely placed to take a leading role and to act in the best interests of these and many other species, rather than the financial interests of wildlife poachers and profiteers.”

The Born Free Foundation is a dynamic international wildlife charity, devoted to compassionate conservation and animal welfare.  Born Free takes action worldwide to protect threatened species and stop individual animal suffering. Born Free believes wildlife belongs in the wild and works to phase out zoos.  The Foundation rescues animals from lives of misery in tiny cages and give them lifetime care.  Born Free protects lions, elephants, tigers, gorillas, wolves, polar bears, dolphins, marine turtles and many more species in their natural habitat, working with local communities to help people and wildlife live together without conflict. The Foundation’s high-profile campaigns change public attitudes, persuade decision-makers and get results.  Every year, Born Free helps hundreds of thousands of animals worldwide. More at www.bornfree.org.uk

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation” — the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film “Born Free,” along with their son Will Travers. Born Free’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org; www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa; and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

Washington, D.C. (June 23, 2014) – Jeffrey Flocken, North American Regional Director, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), issued the following statement regarding a bill passed last week by the New York state legislature which bans  the sale and purchase of elephant and mammoth ivory and rhino horn

“A big victory for endangered elephants and rhinos, as New York enacts a landmark law to ban the sale of ivory and rhino horn.

These bans are important tools for regulating, and, we hope, eventually ending the ivory and rhino horn trade. Every 15 minutes on average, an African elephant is slaughtered for its ivory tusks to support a mass consumer demand. Rhinos, which are also poached for their horns, are similarly threatened. The U.S. ranks as one of the largest ivory consumers in the world and New York serves as one its biggest entry points and markets.

Promising regulations are gathering momentum at the federal level. As one of the first states to pass such legislation, New York is carving a path for others to follow.

We love New York’s actions and congratulate and thank our coalition partners in encouraging the passage of these bills.”

To learn more about IFAW’s work to crush the ivory trade, please visit http://www.ifaw.org/united-states/our-work/elephants/ending-ivory-trade.

 

About IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

###

TPR News
Saturday, June 21, the 172nd day of 2014.
There are 193 days left in the year. First Day of Summer!!!

“Giving Animals the Gift of Tomorrow”

 

Who are we?

Since 1990, BrightHaven has saved over 5,000 senior (16+ years of age), sick or disabled animals, a vulnerable population that has an overwhelming need to find love and care in society. We have evolved into a unique holistic healing arts and education center. Our rescue arm helps shelter animals most at risk for euthanasia. Co-Founders Gail and Richard Pope received the prestigious Jefferson Award in July 2013 in recognition of their tireless efforts to help animals in need.

We are pioneers in our distinct approach to animal hospice: We focus on achieving a state of wellness, joy and balance whether for continued life or for transition. Our hospice care is very much aligned with hospice care for humans where love, comfort, dignity and quality of life are of the highest importance, and the spiritual aspect of the journey is deeply honored.

We are dedicated to improving the care and support of animals with a serious or end-of-life illness. We foster respect and awareness for animals as sentient beings and promote an understanding of death as a natural part of life. Gail and Richard are well-known educators in the growing animal hospice field. Gail proudly served as a founding board member of the International Association for Animal Hospice and Palliative Care (I.A.A.H.P.C.).

What is our mission and vision?

BrightHaven is dedicated to providing rescue and sanctuary to animals in need of specialized treatment, elderly care and hospice. We are not casual in this responsibility. We live a brand mission of providing leadership in the development and application of holistic care for senior and special-needs animals, and animal hospice and its philosophy of care.

What makes us so unique?

Our holistic approach is grounded in classical veterinary homeopathy and the feeding of a natural raw meat-based diet, including the use of nutraceuticals, and animal Reiki and other alternative healing modalities as indicated. Our goal is one of healing for body, mind and spirit. Love—and more love—is a key ingredient of our healing recipe!

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” – Mahatma Gandhi

For more information:

www.brighthaven.org

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 707-578-4800

BrightHaven is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization--donations are tax-deductible

A breaking Mercy For Animals Canada undercover investigation reveals sadistic, criminal cruelty to cows at the country’s largest dairy factory farm, leading law enforcement to raid the factory farm and recommend charges against eight workers.

MFA’s investigator documented employees inflicting horrific abuses on cows, including:

  • Using chains, rakes, metal pipes, and canes to viciously whip, punch, kick, hit, and beat cows
  • Hoisting cows into the air by chains around their necks while other workers screamed obscenities at them
  • Sadistically poking at cows’ festering, pus-filled wounds
  • Violently ripping clumps of hair out of cows’ sensitive tails 

Unfortunately, the abuses captured on hidden camera at this facility are not limited to factory farms in Canada.

In the last five years, Mercy For Animals has conducted five undercover investigations into the dairy industry, and every one of these investigations has led to criminal charges and convictions against workers who were caught on video maliciously abusing animals.

Most recently, our investigation at Wiese Brothers Farms in Wisconsin led to multiple criminal convictions of workers who were caught on hidden camera viciously kicking and whipping cows, beating them in the face and body, and using machinery to cruelly hoist sick or injured cows into the air.

Treated as mere milk-producing machines, cows on dairy factory farms endure lives of near constant misery and deprivation. In order to keep a steady supply of milk, the cows are repeatedly impregnated. Several times a day, dairy cows are hooked by their udders to electric milking machines that can cause the cows to suffer painful lesions and mastitis.

If they don’t move fast enough, the cows are often mercilessly beaten. These highly intelligent and social animals suffer almost unimaginable abuse from the time they are born and ripped from their mothers' sides until they are so physically worn out from repeated pregnancies and constant milk production that they are sold for slaughter.

Please join Mercy For Animals in calling for an end to the worst forms of cruelty in the dairy industry.

Then share the hidden-camera video with friends and encourage them to take action too.

Finally, please consider further helping cows, and all farmed animals, by exploring a diet free of eggs, dairy, and meat.

Thank you.

Nathan Runkle Executive Director

P.S. Want to support our vital work? Click here to make a donation.





TPR News
Saturday, June 7, the 158th day of 2014.
There are 207 days left in the year.

Oakland, CA…May 29, 2014 – Oakland Zoo is happy to announce a new arrival, a baby hamadryas baboon named “Mimi.” The name “Mimi” is Swahili for “I am.” She was born on Wednesday, May 21st in the early morning hours. When zookeepers arrived to work, the baby was found nursing with her mother, Maya. After settling into her surroundings for the past week, she can now be seen daily by the public.

Mimi is the third baby baboon born at Oakland Zoo during the last year and a half. Her older siblings, Kodee and Mocha, are very curious about their little sister. Zookeepers say both troops of baboons are reacting well to the new addition.

 “This new baby is great because not only do we have parent raised baboons, but the other two youngsters are able to witness and participate in infant care, which will only make them better mothers in the future,” said Margaret Rousser, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo.

The baby’s parents are troop leader, Martijn (thirteen years of age) and Maya (nine years of age). The group was relocated to Oakland in 2013 from the Emmen Zoo in the Netherlands. The international move was facilitated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), which Oakland Zoo is accredited by and follows breeding recommendations.

Oakland Zoo has two troops of baboons that can be seen daily by the public from 10:00am - 4:00pm at the Baboon Cliffs exhibit, located down the hill from the African Veldt. The Baboon Cliffs Exhibit opened in the fall of 2009 and is approximately 8,100 square feet in size. It includes a cascading waterfall, climbing structures, a spacious area for the baboons to roam, a night house facility, and offices for Zoo staff. Guests are able to observe all eleven of the baboons from a large viewing deck.

ABOUT HAMADRYAS BABOONS:

Hamadryas baboons live in complex social structures. An adult male will have several females in his “harem” which he will protect in exchange for exclusive breeding rights. The females will develop relationships as well and assist each other with child rearing. While the males are not as involved as the females in rearing the infants, they are good fathers who will protect their offspring and as they get older they will sometimes play with them or otherwise allow them to join in their activities. 

A group of baboons is often referred to as a troop. They are generally 24 – 30 inches in length and can weigh up to 80 pounds (females weigh generally weigh around 40 pounds and males weigh 75-80 pounds). Hamadryas baboons eat vegetables, protein-rich insects, and some red meat. They have an active lifestyle and live to be around 30 – 40 years of age. Hamadryas baboons in the wild are found in Ethiopia, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. In the wild, baboons congregate in very large groups to sleep at night. During the day, they separate into smaller groups to forage for food. Throughout history, Hamadryas baboons were worshipped by Egyptians as the incarnation of their God, Thoth, who is often depicted with the head of a baboon.

ABOUT OAKLAND ZOO:

The Bay Area’s award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid’s activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information please visit our website at www.oaklandzoo.org.

###

Page 1 of 47