ITHACA, N.Y. – Dr. Lorin D. Warnick, interim dean of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, has been named the Austin O. Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine, effective May 6. His appointment was approved this week by the Executive Committee of the Cornell University Board of Trustees and ratified by the Board of Trustees for the State University of New York.

“Lorin is the ideal choice to lead the College of Veterinary Medicine as dean,” said Cornell Provost Michael Kotlikoff, in announcing the appointment. “He is a proven leader who has managed the college effectively and with great thoughtfulness since taking over as interim dean last year. He will keep the college on the cutting edge of best practices in veterinary medicine and scientific research.”

SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher said, “Dr. Warnick’s experience will continue to be a great asset for the college’s faculty, staff and students as well as the medical community.”

“Dr. Warnick has already built upon the college’s foundation of academic excellence and community service,” agreed SUNY Board Chairman H. Carl McCall.

Warnick assumed the post of interim dean Aug. 1, 2015, after Kotlikoff, the college’s previous dean, became provost. Prior to that, Warnick served as associate dean for veterinary education since 2007 and director of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals since 2012. As interim dean, Warnick has supported the college’s ongoing projects, including the preclinical class expansion construction project, which has involved renovating and replacing the center of the college to allow for a larger fall class in 2017. He has also continued a long-standing collaboration with the City University of Hong Kong to develop the first school of veterinary medicine there.

Though Warnick has been a faculty member in the college since 1996, he said, “Being interim dean has given me new insights into how the college operates and an in-depth understanding of the main issues we are facing.”

In his role as dean, Warnick said his overall vision is “to excel in our core missions of research, veterinary education, graduate education and service to the public.”

Specifically, on the research side, Warnick aims to make high-level faculty recruitments, especially in areas of biomedical research, where the college plans to promote collaborations across campus and with Weill Cornell Medicine.

In the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, Warnick said he will continue to work on educational initiatives to improve preparation for the primary care small-animal practice. This will include completion of a new facility to house the college’s Community Practice Service.

In addition to clinical experience, “We want to better prepare our students to be engaged in business entrepreneurship and new technology, and really play a leadership role in the business side of veterinary medicine,” he said.

With the number of U.S. veterinary schools expanding, Warnick sees “recruiting the best DVM students,” with a focus on diversifying each class, as an immediate challenge. He said his administration will continue looking for ways to reduce student debt levels and provide a greater variety of career opportunities. Veterinary medicine affects human and animal health, covering food production and safety, public health, racing and performance horses, biomedical research, wildlife conservation and international development as well as companion animal care. “We would like to have our students prepared and to have options to participate in all of those different areas,” he said.

A professor of ambulatory and production medicine, Warnick’s research focuses on enteric bacteria that can cross species and lead to illness in humans. His work emphasizes Salmonella in dairy cattle. “We look at the Salmonella bacteria that are transferred from cattle to people, and try to determine to what extent the pathogens found in people came from livestock sources,” he said.

Another of his main research areas includes the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria and how much these microbes are shared between different host populations. Warnick said with the help of his lab team he plans to continue with research while serving as dean.

Warnick received a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University (1984), a DVM degree from Colorado State University (1988) and a Ph.D. with an emphasis on epidemiology and statistics from Cornell (1994). He is a diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.

 

“New Jersey is a major hub for imports and transportation of body parts of endangered species.” – Born Free USA CEO

Washington, D.C., May 3, 2016 -- Born Free USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, commends Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey for signing S. 977 into law—a bill that would ban the possession, transport, import, export, processing, sale, or shipment of lions, tigers, leopards, elephants, rhinos, and cape buffalos. These animals are endangered species that fall victim to trophy hunting.

According to Adam M. Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA, “New Jersey is a major hub for imports and transportation of body parts of endangered species. We are thankful for Senator Raymond Lesniak’s leadership on this bill, which is crucial to protecting imperiled species. We commend Governor Christie for signing this bill into law. Born Free has studied wildlife trafficking for more than two decades, and we can conclude that trophy hunting does nothing to enhance conservation. In 2013, Born Free USA, along with partner organizations, commissioned Economists at Large to investigate the facts.  The study proved that the trophy hunting industry makes a minimal contribution to national incomes. As a portion of any national economy, trophy hunting revenue never accounts for more than 0.27 percent of the GDP."

Under this legislation, those violating the law will be guilty of a third degree crime and fines of up to $75,000. The law will go into effect Monday, May 26, 2016, after the Senate and Assembly concur with the governor's conditions.

According to Senator Raymond Lesniak (D-NJ), who sponsored the bill, “Our ban will send a strong message to those who would endanger the very existence of these majestic animals to avoid bringing their ‘trophies’ into New Jersey and better yet, give it up entirely.”

This critical piece of legislation comes less than a year after the tragic death of Cecil the lion, who was allegedly lured outside of Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe and killed by an American hunter. He was shot with an arrow, injured, and tracked for 40 hours before finally being shot with a gun, beheaded, and skinned. The U.S. is a significant market for hunting “trophies” like Cecil. State laws banning the importation of these products are aimed at reducing the demand. Roberts adds, “Born Free USA encourages other states to pass similar legislation in order to protect imperiled species from extinction and ultimately put an end, once and for all, to this horrific ‘sport.’”

Born Free USA is a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation. Through litigation, legislation, and public education, Born Free USA leads vital campaigns against animals in entertainment, exotic “pets,” trapping and fur, and the destructive international wildlife trade. Born Free USA brings to North America the message of “compassionate conservation”—the vision of the United Kingdom-based Born Free Foundation, established in 1984 by Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna, stars of the iconic film Born Free, along with their son, Will Travers. Born Free’s mission is to end suffering of wild animals in captivity, conserve threatened and endangered species, and encourage compassionate conservation globally. More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

 

SAN FRANCISCO – From endangered Asian rhinos to nearly extinct mountain yellow-legged frogs, San Francisco Zoo & Gardens’ role in protecting and conserving wildlife was the theme of its signature fundraiser, ZooFest, on Saturday, April 30.   Honored guest U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein spoke about her love of animals and decades of conservation work, including her latest effort to end poaching with the introduction of S. 27, Wildlife Trafficking Enforcement Act. 

At the event, SF Zoo announced and unveiled the “Dianne Feinstein and Richard Blum Animal Wellness and Conservation Center,” one of the only dedicated facilities in the country to improving husbandry and well-being of Zoo animals.

SF Zoo President Tanya M. Peterson delivered remarks while holding a ball python snake, one of the Zoo’s many resident rescue animals. 

“About 30 percent of our animals are rescued, which is more than most zoos in the country,” said Peterson.  “Thank you to all the donors, members and guests who make it possible to not only save these animals, but communicate important conservation stories to the community for a multiplier effect.”

All funds raised at ZooFest benefit the care and comfort of the animals and help the Zoo accomplish its mission to connect people with wildlife, inspire caring for nature and advance conservation action.  One generous and anonymous donor gifted $100,000 to the Mexican gray wolf exhibit.  The habitat, under construction now, will help SF Zoo care for three incoming animals.  Mexican gray wolves, which were nearly extinct, are part of a Species Survival Plan, and the wolves coming to the Zoo may someday be released back into the wild.  Silent auction items included paintings from the inaugural Animal Artists in Residence project, which sold for nearly $50,000.  

Event chairs, Elizabeth and Steven Revetria and Charlot and Gregory Malin, helped pay tribute to

the 40th Anniversary of the Zoo’s groundbreaking Nature Trail, an educational program which teaches young people to be wildlife conservation ambassadors.  Attendees also viewed lions and tigers inside the Lion House and interacted with ambassador animals from the Koret Animal Resource Center, typically utilized for children’s educational purposes.

About the San Francisco Zoo

Established in 1929, the San Francisco Zoo and Gardens connects people to wildlife, inspires caring for nature and advances conservation action. An urban oasis, the Zoo and Gardens are home to more than 2,000 exotic, endangered and rescued animals representing more than 250 species as well as seven distinct gardens full of native and unusual plants. Located at the edge of the Pacific Ocean where the Great Highway meets Sloat Boulevard, the Zoo is open 365 days a year from 10 am to 5 pm (summer hours) and is accessible by San Francisco MUNI "L" Taraval Line.

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33 lions, rescued from appalling conditions in circuses in Peru and Colombia by Animal Defenders International (ADI), surely cannot believe their eyes this morning as they roared in their first sunrise in the African bush.
 
A record-breaking cargo flight with all 33 lions on board jetted into Johannesburg on Saturday night. The lions, saved during an ADI mission to help enforce bans on wild animal acts in Peru and Colombia, are now settling into their forever home at Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary, situated on a private estate in Limpopo Province. Many of the lions have been declawed and have broken teeth so would not survive in the wild.
 
During an 18-month operation in Peru, ADI raided every circus and rescued every animal.  Known as Operation Spirit of Freedom, and also providing support on wildlife trafficking enforcement, 100 animals were saved – most, including bears and six different species of monkeys, were rehomed in Peru.  Nine circus lions were also handed to ADI in Colombia where a ban has also been passed.
 
A massive ADI relocation effort began on Thursday morning in Bucaramanga in Colombia, with nine lions loaded into travel crates and travelling to Bogota by truck. The same night 24 rescued lions were loaded into travel crates in Peru and taken to Lima Airport.  A huge MD11 aircraft chartered from ethical cargo company Priority Worldwide Services then flew the nine lions from Bogota to Lima where they were joined on board for a trans-Atlantic flight to Johannesburg – not without its problems due to a long delay in Brazil due to a computer problem. The lions were monitored throughout the flight by ADI President Jan Creamer, ADI Vice President Tim Phillips, and ADI veterinarian Eva Chomba. The lions arrived in South Africa on Saturday evening, bellowing out a huge roar that echoed through the aircraft as they touched down. Trucks donated by Ibubesi Transport Logistics then carried the lions to Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary in Limpopo, arriving Sunday morning.
 
The dawn of a new day marks their first full day of freedom under the African sun and new beginnings for the lions in the natural bush environment they now call home. Returning to the homeland their ancestors had been torn from, the lions can feel the African soil beneath their feet and the sun on their backs, protected within an environment they can be given the care they need. One of the nine lions from Colombia, Iron, was the first of the 33 to step into his forever home, clearly relishing being able to rub up against a tree, another first for the big cats who had formerly lived in cages on the back of circus trucks.
 
Jan Creamer ADI President:  “Before ADI rescued them, these animals had never felt the grass beneath their feet or the sun over their heads, yesterday they were in the African bush.  This has been a really important mission because it has eliminated circus suffering in Peru, saving future generations of animals.  Getting the animals home has been exhausting and exhilarating.”
 
Savannah Heuser, founder of Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary: This is their birth-right. African sun, African night skies, African bush and sounds, clouds, summer thunderstorms, large enclosures in a natural setting where they can remember who they are.  We love being part of the final rescue. Knowing that ADI has changed laws means that wild animals will never again be exploited like this again in Peru and that process has begun in Colombia.”
 
To familiarize the big cats with their new home, the lions will initially live in “bonding camps” where families will also be reintroduced. Then, over the coming months, the lions will be released into huge habitats with platforms and watering holes, for which donations are being sought as well as the lions’ ongoing care.  www.lionsbacktoafrica.org   
 
ADI has launched an appeal to fund phase two of the lion habitats and to care for the lions for life, which for some lions could be as long as 20 years. http://bit.ly/1TjatPq

 
The lion flight marked the epic conclusion of the ADI rescue mission in Peru, which TV legend Bob Barker’s DJ & T Foundation helped kickstart with a major donation that enabled ADI to start raiding circuses and removing animals. The cost of the lions’ first class ticket to freedom was funded through an online campaign by ADI and GreaterGood.com, with individuals including Oakland Zoo, Dr. Lo Sprague & Rev. Dr. Gwynne Guibord, Elise Zoli, and the Facebook group ‘Lion Lovers’ stepping in to fund the $10,00 airfare of individual animals.

Businesses have also donated services and goods or discounted services to help get the lions home including Priority Worldwide Services who chartered the MD11F cargo aircraft, Spherical Logistics and Swissport International at Johannesburg Airport, and fencing manufacturer Bonnox, Lood Swanevelder Fencing, Faan Venter, Ibubesi Transport Logistics, and Chill Box (who donated a freezer room at the lions new home).
 
ADI and Emoya would like to thank the Peruvian Government departments, SERFOR and ATFFS, and Police and in Colombia CDMB, a regional wildlife authority in Bucaramanga for enabling this incredible operation to happen.



  
About Animal Defenders International
Operating from Los Angeles, London and Bogota, ADI campaigns across the globe on animals in entertainment, providing technical advice to governments, securing progressive animal protection legislation, drafting regulations and rescuing animals in distress. ADI has a worldwide reputation for providing video and photographic evidence exposing behind-the-scenes suffering in the industry and supporting this evidence with scientific research on captive wildlife and transport. ADI rescues animals and educates the public.  www.ad-international.org
 
About Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary
The Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary is set in 5,000 hectares of pristine African bush on a private estate in Limpopo Province. Opened by Savannah Heuser in 2012 when she was just 16 years old, the sanctuary has a no breeding policy and is not open to the public. https://www.facebook.com/EmoyaBigCats

 
Worldwide end to use of wild animals in traveling shows:  The evidence that the suffering caused to wild animals by the constant travel, severe restrictions on movement and unnatural lifestyle has prompted authorities and governments around the world to end their use.
 
National restrictions on performing animals in travelling circuses, either wild or all animals, have been enacted in 32 countries – Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, India, Iran, Israel, Malta, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Slovenia, Sweden, and Taiwan, The Netherlands. Similar laws are under discussion in the UK, USA, Brazil and Chile.

 

TPR NewsSaturday, April 30, the 121st day of 2016. There are 245 days left in the year.
Crew
Jon Patch – Host
Kellyann Payne -Co Host
Lexi Lapp – Producer
Ben B - Network Producer
Bob Page – Executive ProducerSpecial Guests:
Jeff Lazarus author of Listen Like A Dog will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/30/16 at 5:00pm EST to discuss and give away his new book
Bert de Bien from Nifti Solutions creator of Nifti Safelatch will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/30/16 at 630pm EST to discuss and give away their pet product


Video and Images of Today's Beach Release

Click Here to Watch Video 

Click Here to Download B-Roll Without Captions

(Grand Isle, La.) – Today, Audubon Nature Institute and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries in coordination with NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service and Chicago Zoological Society's Sarasota Dolphin Research Program released a juvenile male dolphin into Barataria Bay. The dolphin is the first to be rescued, rehabilitated and released back into the wild off Louisiana’s coast.

“This is a truly notable event,” explained Mandy Tumlin, the Louisiana State Stranding Coordinator for marine mammals and sea turtles. “Dolphins can be deemed non-releasable for a variety of reasons, such as a medical condition that may hinder their ability to survive.”
 
On October 26, 2015, biologists from LDWF responded to a report by a private citizen of a live, stranded dolphin on Grand Isle Beach. Based on initial evaluations, the 6.5-foot-long juvenile dolphin was responsive. High water and rough seas associated with Hurricane Patricia likely contributed to the cause of the stranding.
 
“It’s unknown how long the animal was on the beach before he was discovered, but that period of time was a definite strain on him,” said Tumlin. “Dolphins are accustomed to buoyancy when in the water, so there is significant strain on their muscles when the animal is stranded and take on their entire body weight."
 
“We had a short window to diagnose whether the animal could be released or brought back to Freeport-McMoRan Audubon Species Survival Center (FMASSC) in New Orleans for treatment,” said Audubon’s Stranding and Rescue Coordinator Gabriella Vazquez. “He was lethargic and had short, shallow breaths. We attempted a soft release in the surf, but he showed no initiative to swim back into the Gulf.”
 
The dolphin was transported to FMASSC and made positive progress in the following months of evaluation and treatment.
Named “Octavius’’ in an affectionate nod to the Audubon veterinarian caring for him, the dolphin responded well to treatment and was able to swim on his own.

In order to determine if the dolphin was a candidate for release, specific milestones needed to be met. First, he was required to pass behavioral clearance. Vazquez explained: “Octavius showed no signs of abnormal swimming, breathing or diving behavior. Importantly, he had not become desensitized to humans – which is crucial because human interaction with dolphins in the wild can be a problem.”
 
Tumlin further explained, “Animals can often become dependent on humans for food and other resources following time in rehabilitative care. Dolphins are very intelligent animals. Over time, they can learn to associate humans and boats as a source for food, which is why it is illegal to feed them in the wild.”
 
Next, the dolphin passed an “auditory evoked potential test” administered by Dr. Dorian S. Houser, Ph.D., Director of Conservation and Biological Research for the National Marine Mammal Foundation, and showed no signs of hearing impairment.
 
Finally, Octavius passed medical clearance, including blood work and veterinary examinations, showing no indication of congenital defects or medical issues that would hinder his ability to survive in the wild.

Because Octavius was only 190cm in length at stranding, he could be as young as 1 year or as old as 7 years (best age estimate is ~3 years). Because there is the possibility that he could be a dependent calf (if he were 1-2 years old), he is being considered a “conditionally releasable” animal. Both LDWF and Audubon are responsible for stringent post monitoring protocols outlined by NOAA/NMFS. Staff will be required to monitor this animal in the wild over the next six weeks.

"Audubon and LDWF have been working tirelessly to care for Octavius," said Vazquez. "While there is still more critical work to be done with post-release monitoring, we have given this animal the best chance for a successful return to the wild."

Dr. Randy Wells, Director of the
Chicago Zoological Society’s Sarasota Dolphin Research Program affixed a tag to the dorsal fin of the dolphin allowing staff to monitor him in real-time. “The tag allows for satellite tracking as well as radio tracking. Since he could be a younger animal, this type of monitoring is necessary to ensure he is thriving back in the wild,” said Tumlin.
 
LDWF Secretary Charlie Melancon added, “While this animal is not completely out of the woods, this is a remarkable story demonstrating the success of our strong partnership with Audubon Nature Institute, working together to preserve this species for future generations. We are happy to be able to return this animal to the wild in its natural environment today.”
 
LDWF leads the response for sea turtles and marine mammal strandings, and Audubon Nature Institute works closely with the department as a response partner to collect data about existing populations of animals along Louisiana’s coast and waterways and to assist and support researchers in the conservation of marine species.
 
“This is one of the latest in a series of successful stranding network rescues across the country,” said
Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman.

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums
facilities make up roughly 25 percent of non-governmental response partners.  According to NOAA, “Over the last decade, 7,979 marine mammal standings have been reported in the Southeast region with an average of 798 strandings per year."
 
“This cooperative group of partners has rescued, rehabilitated and released more than 200 sea turtles and marine mammals since 2010,” said Forman. “It is critically important that we all work together to save animals in the wild.”
 
“We are particularly grateful to the public who continually assist us with our recovery efforts by reporting these strandings to our department,” said Melancon. “Robert Shannon, the individual who first discovered the dolphin lying beached on its side, likely saved this animal's life.”
 
The public can contact LDWF’s stranding hotline at (337) 962-7092 or Audubon Coastal Wildlife at (504) 235-3005 if they encounter an injured or stranded (live or dead) marine mammal or sea turtle or report strandings through NOAA's Dolphin & Whale 911 app for your smartphone (
http://1.usa.gov/1b1kqfv).

Click Here to Download High-Resolution Images

Click Here to Watch Video of Rescue

Audubon Nature Institute
Audubon Nature Institute operates a family of museums, parks and research facilities dedicated to celebrating the wonders of nature. Through innovative live animal exhibits, education programs, and scientific discovery, Audubon makes a meaningful contribution to preserving wildlife for the future. Audubon Nature Institute flagships include Audubon Park, Audubon Zoo, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, Entergy Giant Screen Theater, Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, Freeport-McMoRan Audubon Special Survival Center, Woldenberg Riverfront Park and Audubon Wilderness Park. Ron Forman is President and CEO of Audubon Nature Institute.

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NEWS  RELEASE!

  

The Standard Dog Leash Snap Hook that's been Around for Over 100 Years has been Reinvented!

USING A BOLT SNAP HOOK HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER OR SAFER!

Titusville, FL... Nifti Solutions, Inc. is proud to announce our latest patented pet product the Nifti SafeLatch™ Pet Safety Leash that was recently launched at Global Pet Expo.

Bolt Snap Latches are most commonly used for pets and have been around for over a century. Revolutionary Nifti SafeLatch™ is a redesigned modern bolt snap latch that provides life-saving benefits for pets and allows a one-hand connection to  pet's collar or harness providing operational safety while handling the latch. Nifti SafeLatch™ has been independently pull force tested to exceed 660 lbs. Life -saving benefits and ease of use has been incorporated into this robust high quality product.

The life line between you and your pet is your pet's leash and Nifti SafeLatch™ is the first and only bolt snap latch that addresses life-saving pet safety, automatic one-hand operation including user's safety by keeping fingers safely away from the latch's opening.

New! Nifti SafeLatch™ Pet Safety Leash is available in 5 colors; Black, Red, Royal Blue, Neon Pink & Neon Orange in Large/Medium size. You can purchase on Amazon.com, www.NiftiSafeLatch.com and soon at quality pet product retailers. Suggested retail price: $24.99.

Enter Promo Code:  talkinpets5off and get $5 off plus free shipping on purchase of 2 or more

As Seen In

TTPM - Toys, Tots, Pets & More, ByAndy Krinner, Pet Content Director

Top 5 Dog Gear & Products for National Pet Day - April 11, 2016

Product Review - March 14, 2016

THE GADGETEER, By Andy Jacobs

Product Review - March 11, 2016

SANDY ROBINS ONLINE, By Sandy Robins

Product Review - Must Have Products- March 8, 2016

PET BUSINESS MAGAZINE - April 2016

New Products - DOGS - Page 26

PET PRODUCT NEWS INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE - April 2016

Dog Marketplace - Page 42

PET AGE MAGAZINE - February 2016

Trends & Products - Page 27

About Nifti Solutions, Inc.: Nifti Solutions, Inc. was formed to create, develop, manufacture and supply high-quality, safe pet products. Nifti Solutions, Inc. is available by phone at (888) 703-1414. Please direct general inquiries toThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..'; document.getElementById('cloak55286').innerHTML += ''+addy_text55286+'<\/a>'; //-->

BirdLife International, American Bird Conservancy (ABC), IUCN, UNEP, GEF, and the Governments of Brazil, Chile, and Madagascar team up to safeguard endangered species

(Montreal/Cambridge/Washington, D.C., April 28, 2016)Gathered in Montreal1, leading conservation organizations have announced a new global initiative to prevent the extinction of endangered species, in partnership with the governments of Brazil, Chile, and Madagascar.

Supported by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the initiative will mobilize $6.7 million to deliver a project entitled the “Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE): Conserving Earth’s Most Irreplaceable Sites for Endangered Biodiversity.”AZEis a global initiative working to prevent species extinctions by identifying and safeguarding the places where Endangered or Critically Endangered species are restricted to single remaining sites.

Birds such as theStresemann’s Bristlefront2, clinging to existence with fewer than 15 known individuals in significantly fragmented habitat in Brazil, will be targeted. The project’s focus will be the creation and improved management effectiveness of protected areas and the improved conservation status of AZE species at five demonstration sites in Brazil, Chile, and Madagascar and at an additional 10 sites globally.3

“By focusing on those sites that represent the tip of the iceberg of the extinction crisis, the Alliance for Zero Extinction is a key approach to save species from extinction,” said Gustavo Fonseca, GEF Director of Programs. “These are sites that are the last remnants for entire species. Saving the habitat is saving these fragile species."

Carlos Alberto de Mattos Scaramuzza, Ministry of the Environment, Government of Brazil,stated:“By expanding the Mata do PassarinhoReserve and working with local landowners, this initiative will provide a vital lifeline for the critically endangered Stresemann’s Bristlefront. The initiative will provide essential information to inform national species conservation efforts, by focusing effort on the last remaining habitats of endangered species.”

Neville Ash, UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre Director,said:“Working with the GEF and other partners, this UNEP project is the first global effort to integrate AZE as a distinct priority into conservation planning at the national level. It will scale up best practices on effective and equitable management of the world’s ecological safety nets, and has potential to have a major long-term reduction of global extinction rates, directly contributing towards CBD’s Aichi Targets 11 and 12.”

Braulio Dias, Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity,stated:“Protecting the last remaining habitats for critically endangered species is a vital strategy for preventing extinctions. The CBD Secretariat welcomes this initiative as a contribution towards global species conservation efforts.”

Diego Flores Arrate, Ministry of the Environment, Government of Chile,said: “In Chile, the initiative seeks to create conditions for the survival of three amphibian species, by protecting their habitat and reducing impacts from farming, ranching, and logging activities, considering a participatory approach with different stakeholders.”

Paola Mosig Reidl, CONABIO, Government of Mexico,stated:“Mexico is a strong supporter of the Alliance for Zero Extinction. As host of the CBD COP this year, Mexico welcomes the role of the AZE initiative in informing global species conservation efforts.”

Michael Parr, Chairman of AZE and Chief Conservation Officer for American Bird Conservancy,said: “AZE presents an ambitious but realistic plan to address Earth’s pending extinction crisis. This is a team effort that ultimately needs to involve all of us. The time for action is now.”

Pepe Clarke, Head of Policy, BirdLife International,stated:“This initiative is particularly important as it links local conservation action to national and international policy. We are truly honoured to be working with the Governments of Brazil, Chile and Madagascar.”

# # #

- Colorado rancher sold over 1,700 wild horses for slaughter in Mexico
- Government agency BLM spent $140,000 of taxpayer money to transport horses
- 10,275 people so far have called on the Attorney General to deliver justiceConejos County, Colorado

(April 27, 2016) Over 10,000 people have joined In Defense of Animals to call on the US Attorney General to deal justice to a Colorado rancher and government agency involved in sending over 1,700 wild horses to their brutal deaths in Mexico.Rancher and livestock hauler Tom Davis purchased 1,794 wild horses through the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program, then willingly sold them to be slaughtered in Mexico. The actions were conducted over a period of four years, and contravene a Congressional ban that protects wild horses and Bureau policy.“The overwhelming response to our open letter shows that the public will not tolerate BLM’s attempts to wash its hands clean of the blood of thousands of wild horses,” said Dr Marilyn Kroplick, President of In Defense of Animals. “It is unacceptable that these majestic horses have been ruthlessly exploited by a greedy rancher using taxpayers’ money. We call on the United States Department of Justice to prosecute Davis and show that horse killers will not be tolerated.”An investigation conducted by the Department of the Interior determined that government agency BLM spent more than $140,000 of taxpayer money transporting horses to Davis between 2008 and 2012. During the investigation, Davis opined that “BLM had to know that the horses would end up at a slaughterhouse”. The report reveals that Davis bought horses for just $10 and sold them for $100, and made tens of thousands of dollars in profit.Despite the damning findings, both the US Attorney's Office for the District of Colorado and the State of Colorado Conejos County District Attorney's Office have declined civil and criminal prosecution and the BLM has stated that it will take no further action specific to Mr Davis.“Wild horses are protected by law, and the government agency BLM is committing criminal acts by taking them,” said wild horse advocate and Meet America TV Producer Annie Griffin. “With my own eyes, I have seen the terror and suffering of our wild horses, a symbol of our American freedom, as they are rounded up and sent to slaughter. Attorney General Loretta Lynch must pass justice on the BLM thugs and force them to return taxpayer money spent sending horses to a known horse-slaughter seller.”The horse killing open letter to the Department of Justice can be read and signed here http://bit.ly/horsejustice 

In Defense of Animals is an international animal protection organization located in San Rafael, Calif. dedicated to protecting animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats through education, outreach, and our hands-on rescue facilities in India, Africa, and rural Mississippi.

Talkin' Pets News

4/23/2016

Host - Jon Patch

Co-Host - Dr. Sue Topor

Executive Producer - Bob Page

Producer - Daisy Charlotte

Network Producer - Ben

Special Guests:

Kim Kavin, Author of "The Dog Merchants" will join Jon and Talkin' Pets on 4/23/16 at 5pm EST to discuss and give away her book

Co-Founder of Beco Pets Toby Massey will join Jon and Talkin' Pets 4/23/16 at 630 pm EST to discuss and give away his new Beco Flyer

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