TOOTH TO TAIL ANTIOXIDANT ORAL GEL FOR PETS LAUNCHES NATIONWIDE

Fluffy and Scout are just a lick away from great breath

 
Dallas, TXTooth to Tail is launching the new pet breath freshener Tooth to Tail Antioxidant Oral Gel. According to the company’s research, nearly one-third of all dog owners admit they avoid cuddling with their four-legged friends because of their smelly breath. What they don't know is that bad breath is just one symptom of trouble in their pet’s mouth, which can include dental disease. If left unchecked, an unhealthy mouth could lead to heart disease and kidney disease and ultimately take years off a pet's life.   
 
Russell Moon, CEO of Tooth to Tail stated: "After three years of scientific research and clinical trials conducted by the country's top veterinary and human dentists, the findings indicated that Tooth to Tail is the only breath freshener on the market to contain clinically proven antioxidant technology.  It contains the essential oils menthol and thymol plus polyphenolic antioxidants that neutralize volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), the root cause of bad breath.”
 
Studies have shown that bacteria and enzymes, the main culprits in pets' mouths, break down food particles, oral cells and other proteins. This breakdown releases volatile sulfur compounds. The sulfur in VSC is the same formulation that causes the stinky smell in rotten eggs, skunk spray and even intestinal gas.
 
The gel comes with a stick applicator.  To use, simply place a small amount of the tasty gel on the applicator and let your pet lick it off.   The gel works with the cells in the pet's saliva to create fresh breath and better oral hygiene.  No toothbrush is needed!
 
The Secret Antioxidant Combination
  • Pure polyphenols derived from natural plant sources.  
  • The polyphenols phloretin and ferulic acid are powerful antioxidants that work together in synergy.
  • Antioxidants and essential oils neutralize volatile VSC that cause foul breath odor.
These unique antioxidants adhere to oral tissue to keep combating VSC, unlike mass market brands like chew treats and water-based fresheners that only mask bad breath. Tooth to Tail Antioxidant Oral Gel has unique antioxidants that work in concert with naturally occurring salivary antioxidants.
 
In a clinical study, veterinarians found that 100% of the subject dogs had improved breath using Tooth To Tail Antioxidant Oral Gel and eight out of ten owners reported reduced bad breath within days. 
 
About Tooth to Tail
Founded in 2010 and headquartered in Dallas, Texas, Tooth to Tail is committed to world-class research and to providing the most advanced products for animal oral health. Because veterinary professionals are in the best position to interpret the scientific research published on antioxidants, Tooth to Tail markets its high-end line of oral care products through veterinary practices and other high end animal care professionals.
 
While many professionals choose to carry an amount of inventory, Tooth to Tail has the ability to ship products from the warehouse directly to the patient’s home so professional offices do not need to maintain extensive inventory. The company's unique IT platform can enable any website with e-commerce so that pet owners can sign up online for direct shipment from their website. The product is available through http://www.ToothtoTail.com and veterinary professionals.
 
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TPR News
Saturday, April 12, the 102nd day of 2014.
There are 263 days left in the year.TIH

ANXIETY WRAP® PUTS STRESSED PETS AT EASE

Reading Your Dog’s Body Language

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. – Pet parents would love to know what their pets are thinking, but since our pets can’t verbally tell us it’s important to understand what their body language is saying. Here are a few ways to read your dog’s body language, and how to interpret what they are trying to tell you.

A dog’s tail - A dog’s tail is used to communicate strong emotions, including happiness, as well as anger and agitation. To accurately get the bigger picture the dog’s wagging or tucked tail is trying to tell you, look at the rest of his body language. If his ears are pinned forward or back, or has stiffened muscles and dilated pupils, these are all signs your dog needs some space.

A dog’s ears - A dog will hold his ears naturally when he is relaxed and comfortable. When he’s alert, he’ll raise them higher on his head and direct them toward whatever is holding his interest. If his ears are pulled back slightly, it’s a signal his intention is friendly. And if your dog’s ears are completely flattened or stuck out to the sides of his head, he’s signaling that he’s frightened or feeling submissive.

 

A dog’s body - When your dog is scared, he does his best to look small. Often, his body looks hunched, with his tail held low or tucked between his rear legs and his ears flattened back on his skull. His muscles of his body and face will be tense and rigid. He might even cower close to the ground or try to escape.

                                                                                                                                                         

Some pets fear certain sounds (like thunderstorms or fireworks), being in crowds, or even being left alone. To help ease their various fears, the original, patented Anxiety Wrap gives a calming, hug-like sensation – activating and maintaining key pressure points that better enable pets to relax. Helping your dog keep calm can even prevent behavioral issues. (For additional notes on how the one-of-a-kind product works, click here to see helpful Anxiety Wrap graph and notes.)

According to Dr. Roger Mugford, Pet Psychologist and Founder of The Company of Animals, “Fear and anxiety are at the root of many canine behavioral problems.” Unaddressed, these fears can result in aggressiveness, leash pulling, separation anxiety, excessive barking, and hyperactivity. We’ve been using and recommending the Anxiety Wrap in The Company of Animals’ own British Behaviour Centre for years,” continues Mugford.

A recently published Tufts University Clinical Research Study, titled “The Effectiveness of Anxiety Wrap in the Treatment of Canine Thunderstom Phobia: An Open-Label Trial,” even deemed the product 89 percent effective! The Anxiety Wrap was especially called out as "safe and effective treatment for canine thunderstorm phobia." The study has since been published, and the Anxiety Wrap cited, in such respected journals and resources as The Journal of Veterinary Behavior and ScienceDirect.

The Anxiety Wrap starts at $39.95 and comes in 11 canine sizes – to properly fit each age and breed. There are even calming face wraps for dogs, called Quite Dog®, and specialty made feline Anxiety Wraps, available too.For the full product selection by The Company of Animals, visit www.CompanyofAnimals.us.

www.CompanyofAnimals.us| www.Facebook.com/TheCompanyOfAnimalsUS| www.Twitter.com/COAnimals_US

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE COMPANY OF ANIMALS

Founded by pet behaviorist Dr. Roger Mugford, The Company of Animals is celebrating 35 years as a leading provider of innovative training products designed to achieve a positive relationship between pets and their parents. The Company of Animals designs and manufactures a wide range of acclaimed products, including the original HALTI®, Pet CorrectorTM and CLIXTM training range. The latest additions to the famed family of enrichment products are the line of GREEN Feeders for dogs and cats by NORTHMATE, the Anxiety Wrap® and the new HALTI® OPTIFIT. For more information, visit www.CompanyofAnimals.us.

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TPR News
Saturday, March 15, the 74th day of 2014.
There are 291 days left in the year.

"The Ides of March" is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to 15 March.

THIRTEEN's Nature Relates Stories of Animals

Getting a New Lease on Life when

My Bionic Pet airs

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 on PBS

The use of animal prosthetics is on the rise

Animals that have met with misfortune, whether from a birth defect, accident, disease or even human cruelty, are now getting a second chance at life due to human intervention and technological advances. Left disabled without limbs, fins, flippers, beaks or tails, these creatures face a grim future, if one at all. But innovative prosthetics can change those survival odds if someone comes to their rescue.

Nature profiles these animals, their rescuers and the individuals whose work has transformed their lives when My Bionic Pet airs Wednesday, April 9 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After the broadcast, the episode will be available for online streaming at pbs.org/nature.

My Bionic Pet shows that while animal prosthetics are sometimes later retrofitted for human needs, engineers most often adapt human technologies to an animal's anatomy. Westcoast Brace & Limb in Tampa, Florida, made its first brace for a dog named Journey, a golden retriever born without his front left paw. Jennifer Robinson, until recently the patient program director at Westcoast, and born with a limb deficiency of both legs, has a close bond with him. She often worked with Journey, a certified therapy dog, helping amputees adjust to life with prosthetics. The dog has also become a favorite visitor to patients at St. Joseph's Children Hospital, as well as veterans and the elderly.

The fabrication and subsequent operation to attach artificial limbs can be expensive, but as My Bionic Pet explains, a number of people have volunteered to assume the costs - sometimes with fundraising support - and even care of these disabled animals. Los Angeles area friends Kathy Wyer and Elodie Lorenz decided to co-foster Roofus, a blind golden retriever with deformed front legs, and arrange for specialized prosthetics that allow him to walk with all four legs. Likewise, Tara Bayne and Devin Napier from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, became owners of Driftwood, a border collie puppy born with both rear feet missing. Nature follows Driftwood's surgery and subsequent first steps on his new artificial hind feet.

The documentary notes that it's often a matter of trial and error before a solution is reached. It was a team effort by Phoenix's Core Institute and Midwestern University professor Justin Georgi to design a replacement rubber tail for Mr. Stubbs, an alligator whose appendage was bitten off by a larger gator. Other stories include replacing part of a swan's deformed beak so he can preen and eat properly at the Carolina Waterfowl Rescue in Indian Trail, North Carolina; and providing Molly, an injured pony, with a new prosthetic leg so she can serve as a therapy animal around the New Orleans area.

Not every disability requires a high-tech solution. When a piglet, born with deformed, unusable back legs, was brought to veterinarian Dr. Len Lucero's clinic to be euthanized, the Florida vet offered to take care of him. Dr. Lucero built a wheeled harness from some of his son's old toys so newly named pet Chris P. Bacon could move around. The porcine pet has since graduated to a wheelchair originally built for dogs, having outgrown his first homemade device.

Nature is a production of THIRTEEN in association with WNET for PBS.  For Nature, Fred Kaufman is executive producer. My Bionic Pet is a production of Pangolin Pictures and THIRTEEN Productions LLC in association with WNET.

Nature pioneered a television genre that is now widely emulated in the broadcast industry.  Throughout its history, Nature has brought the natural world to millions of viewers.  The series has been consistently among the most-watched primetime series on public television.

Nature has won over 700 honors from the television industry, the international wildlife film communities and environmental organizations, including 11 Emmys and three Peabodys.  The series received two of wildlife film industry's highest honors: the Christopher Parsons Outstanding Achievement Award given by the Wildscreen Festival and the Grand Teton Award given by the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. Recently, the International Wildlife Film Festival honored Nature executive producer Fred Kaufman with its Lifetime Achievement Award for Media.

PBS.org/nature is the award-winning web companion to Nature, featuring streaming episodes, filmmaker interviews, teacher's guides and more.

Support for this Nature program was made possible in part by the Arnhold Family in memory of Clarisse Arnhold, the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, the Filomen M. D'Agostino Foundation, by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and by the nation's public television stations.

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About WNET


As New York's flagship public media provider and the parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21 and operator of NJTV, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to over 5 million viewers each week. WNET produces and presents such acclaimed PBS series as Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend, Charlie Rose and a range of documentaries, children's programs, and local news and cultural offerings available on air and online. Pioneers in educational programming, WNET has created such groundbreaking series as Get the Math, Oh Noah! and Cyberchase and provides tools for educators that bring compelling content to life in the classroom and at home. WNET highlights the tri-state's unique culture and diverse communities through NYC-ARTS, Reel 13, NJTV News with Mike Schneider and MetroFocus, the multi-platform news magazine focusing on the New York region. WNET is also a leader in connecting with viewers on emerging platforms, including the THIRTEEN Explore iPad App where users can stream PBS content for free.


About "Think Wednesday"


My Bionic Pet is part of PBS' new "Think Wednesday" programming lineup of television's best science, nature and technology programming that includes the acclaimed series NATURE and NOVA, the highest-rated nature and science series on television, coupled with new special programming at 10 p.m.  Wednesday nights on PBS offer new perspectives on life in the universe and keep viewers both curious and wanting more.

TPR NEWS
Saturday, March 8, the 67th day of 2014. There are 298 days left in the year.

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday at 2 a.m. locally. Clocks go forward one hour.

 

Masson brings the behavior of his animal subjects vividly and enchantingly to life…Truly fascinating.”

 

Dr. Jane Goodall on The Evolution of Fatherhood

 

 

 

A masterpiece…the most comprehensive and compelling argument for animal sensibility that I've yet seen.”

 

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, on When Elephants Weep

 

 

 

Masson's rare combination of passionate advocacy and scientific perspicacity makes this book unusually powerful. As a psychoanalyst, he addresses the psychological and emotional barriers that keep people from adopting a compassionate lifestyle - and one so manifestly in their own interest, as well as society's and the planet's.”

 

  • The Atlantic on The Face on Your Plate

 

 

 

BEASTS

 

What Animals Can Teach Us About the Origins of Good and Evil

 

by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson

 

 

 

Bestselling author Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson has delved deep into the unexplored territory of animal emotions, but in his new book he tackles the wildest creature of all – humans. BEASTS: What Animals Can Teach Us About the Origins of Good and Evil (Bloomsbury; March 4, 2014) is an illuminating account of the relationship between humans, animals, and our perception of violence.

 

 

 

A given person might say they fear shark attacks more than his fellow man, but there is a glaring discrepancy with this prevalent misconception: sharks, orcas, big cats, and other fearsome predators are not nearly as aggressive as humans. We are the only species responsible for killing over 200 million of our own members in the last century alone.

 

 

 

Masson has taught us how to explore human emotions through animal behavior – the way dogs love, cats practice independence, and elephants grieve for their lost ones. In BEASTS, Masson examines the difference between the unchecked aggression and predatory behavior that separates humans from animals, and who the real beasts are.

 

 

 

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, an ex-psychoanalyst and former director of the Freud Archives, is the author of numerous bestselling books on animal emotions, including Dogs Never Lie About Love and When Elephants Weep. He lives in New Zealand, but will be traveling to the U.S. at publication.

 

 

March 4, 2014—Elephants in iSimangaliso Wetland Park, located in KwaZulu Natal province on South Africa’s East coast, were treated for the first time with a contraceptive vaccine to control the population’s growth rate.

With the addition of iSimangaliso’s population, immunocontraception is now being used to successfully control elephant populations in 15 parks and reserves, including Tembe Elephant Park (commenced in 2007) in South Africa. Two other populations in KwaZulu Natal—Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park and Ithala—will also receive their first vaccination later this year.

Immunocontraception is a non-hormonal form of contraception that is based on the scientific principles of immunization through vaccination.

All three populations will receive three years of treatment under an agreement between Ezemvelo KwaZulu Natal Wildlife (Ezemvelo) and Humane Society International (HSI), with funding from -Ezemvelo, HSI and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under the African Elephant Conservation Fund.

Although elephant poaching and trafficking in ivory severely threatens the survival of African elephants in several African states, in South Africa poaching remains fairly low. As a result, the country needs to manage elephant populations, especially in small enclosed parks and private conservancies, to slow their growth rates so as to prevent loss of biodiversity, to maintain ecosystem function and resilience, to reduce harm to human lives or livelihoods, and to avoid compromising key management objectives.

Research conducted over the past 18 years has resulted in a robust body of scientific work demonstrating that immunocontraception is a safe and effective way to control elephant population growth that has no effect on behavior. It is also reversible, allowing managers to fine-tune population growth.

HSI and its affiliate, The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), have funded cutting edge research on the use of immunocontraception in African elephants since 1996. The immunocontraception vaccine contains agents that, when injected into African elephant cows, causes an immune response that prevents eggs from being fertilized by sperm. The vaccine is delivered remotely by dart gun, making the technique minimally invasive and eliminating the need for anaesthetization. Use of immunocontraception is a preferable alternative to other less desirable, more expensive and difficult population reduction methods such as culling or capture and translocation which, ultimately, do not solve the problem because populations reactively increase as remaining elephants continue to reproduce.

Audrey K. Delsink, HSI’s field director for the Elephant Contraception Program in South Africa, said: “We are very pleased to be working with Ezemvelo and iSimangaliso on this project. We hope that more elephant managers will fully embrace and use this technology to control elephant population growth in a proactive, effective and humane manner.”

Andrew Zaloumis, CEO of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, said “Elephants were reintroduced into iSimangaliso in 2003 after a one-hundred year absence. President Mandela described this as ‘almost spiritual, a form of restitution ... an attempt to recreate the wholeness of nature so that we can live in harmony with its creator’s magnificence … so that the descendants of the elders of Maputaland, the generations of the future, too can experience this grandeur.’iSimangaliso today represents one of the world’s leading examples of the modern era of conservation and we are pleased to implement the latest technology in elephant population control within our park to effectively manage the numbers without negative consequences.”

Read more about immunocontraception of elephants here http://www.hsi.org/assets/pdfs/elephant_immuno_report_2012.pdf

About HSI: Humane Society International and its partner organizations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. For more than 20 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide—on the Web at hsi.org.

About Ezemvelo: Ezemvelo is the conservation authority for the province of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. The organisation has been in existence for over 100 years and is mandated to conserve and manage the biodiversity of the KZN province. There are 100 protected areas and Ezemvelo strives to provide a high standard conservation and eco-tourism product – www.kznwildlife.com

About iSimangaliso Wetland Park: South Africa’s first world heritage site was inscribed in 1999 by UNESCO for its outstanding universal values - ecological processes; superlative natural phenomena and scenic beauty; and exceptional biodiversity and threatened species. The park comprises 332 000ha of terrestrial and marine protected area and is one of the country’s premier destinations as well as a global treasure. Visit www.isimangaliso.com for park information.

 



Groundbreaking Giant Screen and Digital 3D Film Features Unrivalled Access To Highly Endangered Species And Highlights Conservation Efforts To Repopulate Them in the Wild

Opens In IMAX®, Giant Screen, Dome and Digital Cinemas in North America Spring 2014

WASHINGTON (February 27, 2014)--The giant panda is one of the rarest species on our planet. A shy, elusive and gentle creature, they once ranged in great numbers between Beijing and the Himalayas. But now, after centuries of human expansion and destruction of their habitat, the giant pandas are on the brink of extinction, with fewer than 1,600 remaining. PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME, a groundbreaking natural-history film, captures for the first time in 3D on the world's largest screens the highly endangered giant pandas living in Wolong National Nature Reserve in the People's Republic of China. This new 3D/2D giant screen film experience gives audiences a unique glimpse into one of the most incredible conservation efforts in human history. The scientists' goal: to increase the numbers in captivity and, far more ambitiously, to return pandas to the wild --to their natural home. Presented by National Geographic Entertainment, this original production will premiere in 3D, 2D, 15/70 and digital formats and will open in giant-screen, IMAX® and digital 3-D cinemas around the United States and worldwide beginning spring 2014.

Directed by Nicolas Brown (Human Planet) and produced by Caroline Hawkins (Meerkats 3D), PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME, is an Oxford Scientific Films Production for National Geographic Entertainment and Sky 3D, in association with the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association, Wolong Panda Conservation Centre, CCTV9 and Nat Geo WILD.

Narrated by Joely Richardson, the 40-minute large format film PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME follows the pandas at a significant milestone in their history. After decades of captive breeding, the Wolong National Nature Reserve has hit its target number of 300 giant pandas and now must tackle the challenge of reintroducing breeding populations of the species to the wild. Filmmakers were given unrivalled access to the Wolong National Nature Reserve with the support of the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association and the China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda. Oxford Scientific Films was granted permission to film the rare release of a panda bred in captivity and to follow a group of pandas being prepared for the wild in a mountain habitat, a first for a Western film crew. Alongside the natural breeding program, the film also captures the captive breeding program, including footage of newborns, young pandas playing, and methods of encouraging pandas to mate.

"PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME
will give audiences insight into the extraordinary strides that have been made towards saving the panda in the wild, but will also convey that much work has yet to be done," said Lisa Truitt, president of National Geographic Cinema Ventures (NGCV). "This is an important story, and National Geographic is grateful for the special access in order to feature the iconic, beloved, charismatic panda on the giant screen and in 3D."

Audiences will also get a chance to help with the conservation effort by participating in a texting campaign to raise funds for the preservation of the pandas' shrinking habitats. They can text PANDA to 50555 to contribute $10 towards a grant that National Geographic will award to the World Wildlife Fund for one of its panda conservation programs, details of which can be found at http://ngpandas.com.

PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME
is a true exploration of the environment the pandas are being equipped to live in, taking audiences to the center of the fight to reveal the incredible lengths researchers are going to in order to save them from extinction. PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME follows China's quest to save the giant panda from extinction and the remarkable process leading to the release of a young male panda into the wild.

Very little is known about the behavior and breeding patterns of these shy mountain creatures. Breeding them in captivity largely began as a case of trial and error. But the plan is working and now the dream of releasing captive-bred pandas into the wild has become a reality. At birth, pandas are exceptionally vulnerable; blind and tiny. The cubs at Wolong National Nature Reserve's Bifengxia Panda Base are raised carefully and lovingly, developing playful and affectionate bonds with their keepers, and are carefully monitored by the vets and wildlife scientists at the base.

After years spent simply trying to breed more cubs and raise them to adulthood, the conservationists are now embarking on the next phase of their species-wide rescue mission: releasing these charges back into the wild. But there is a challenge facing them. Pandas raised by humans are not equipped to survive on their own. The last panda to be released, several years ago, survived for only one year before being killed by predators. The conservationists are determined to prevent tragedies like this from happening, and have developed a comprehensive wild training program for the pandas in their care. As a transitional environment, they use the breeding center in Wolong, where the pandas are distanced from humans and prepared to live a life in the wild.

Audiences are introduced to one of the residents, Tao-Tao, who is destined to be released into the remote LiTzu Ping reserve, where only 13 pandas remain. The hope is that Tao-Tao, strong and healthy, will find a female panda and introduce a new bloodline to this precious wild group. Tao-Tao could be the last chance of survival for this tiny population of giant pandas. Audiences are introduced to the conservationists at Wolong tasked to teach Tao-Tao to find water and food on his own and to recognize danger. Cameras capture Tao-Tao's much-anticipated release into the wild, an emotional culmination of years of work, carrying the hope for the future of the species.

PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME
invites audiences to witness all of the extraordinary efforts to save the panda and introduce them back in to the wild. With the species excruciatingly close to extinction, PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME is an extraordinary picture of how pandas live and the astonishing measures conservationists are taking to ensure their future.

For more information on PANDAS: THE JOURNEY HOME, including Theater Listings, links to the trailer, and behind-the-scenes videos, visit http://ngpandas.com. Become a fan on Facebook at facebook.com/NatGeoMovies. Or follow us on Twitter @NatGeoMovies.

About National Geographic Cinema Ventures/National Geographic Entertainmen
t
National Geographic Cinema Ventures/National Geographic Entertainment is responsible for production and distribution of giant screen, 3-D and specialty films. Over the last decade, NGCV/NGE has produced or released a number of successful films, including Oscar-nominated documentaries "Restrepo" and "The Story of the Weeping Camel"; giant-screen award-winning films "Sea Monsters: A Prehistoric Adventure," "U2 3D," "Mysteries of Egypt" and "Forces of Nature"; and feature-length films "The Last Lions" and "Life in a Day." Lisa Truitt is president of NGCV/NGE, and Mark Katz is president of NGCV/NGE distribution. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com/movies.
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