Jon Patch

Jon Patch

Graduated from Penn State University in 1983 and landed my first broadcasting job at the flagship station to SUN Radio Network in St. Petersburg, FL as a producer of talk radio.  In 3 months advanced to a network producer, then on air as a national eventually local weather reporter for the Tampa Bay area.  Held a position in management as a trainer to new hosts and producers and later Affiliate Relations Manager, eventually in 1990 started hosting, Talkin’ Pets.  Left SUN radio several years later and worked with USA Radio Networks for 1 year.  Have now been working with Business TalkRadio & Lifestyle TalkRadio Networks for the past 12 years under the title of Affiliate Relations and am still hosting the largest and longest running pet radio and internet show in the country, Talkin’ Pets, for the past 20 years…  My one true passion in life is to help to educate the world through interviews with celebrities like Betty White, Tippi Hedren, Bob Barker, Linda Blair and others, authors, foundations and organizations like the ASPCA, LCA, HSUS, AHA, WSPA on the ways to make this world a better place for all animals and mankind in which share this very fragile and mysterious planet called earth.  The only home we have so we all need to learn how to share and maintain it so that life for us all continues and evolves forever...

Friday, 10 January 2014 15:12

Spinning Plates

Inception Media Group Proudly Presents
Spinning Plates

Friday, 10 January 2014 15:09

Balls to the Wall

Inception Media Group Proudly Presents
Balls to the Wall

(Jan. 9, 2014)—The following is a statement from Kimberley Alboum, North Carolina state director for The Humane Society of the United States, calling on Randolph County officials to reconsider their decision to continue the use of gas chambers at the county animal shelter. The HSUS gave the county a $3,000 grant in 2011 to fulfill its commitment to eliminate their gas chambers, but it was recently discovered that the chamber is still in use. The county was asked to either honor their commitment to discontinue using the chamber or return the funds, and has chosen the latter.

“We are saddened and dismayed that officials of Randolph County, North Carolina have chosen to reverse their commitment to end their use of a gas chamber in the county shelter.

It is shocking that a North Carolina county would return desperately needed funding for their animal shelter because they would rather continue a practice that has been denounced by every national humane organization. This does nothing but hurt the animals of Randolph County, for absolutely no reason.

We of course would prefer that the shelter keep the money and honor their commitment to stop the use of the gas chamber. We urge Randolph County officials to reconsider, and do the right thing."

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, rated the most effective by its peers. Since 1954, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. We rescue and care for tens of thousands of animals each year, but our primary mission is to prevent cruelty before it occurs. We're there for all animals, across America and around the world. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty—on the Web at humanesociety.org.

(Washington, D.C.) January 9, 2014—In a move that brings Congress one step closer to allowing veterinarians the complete ability to provide care to their animal patients beyond their clinics, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) praised the U.S. Senate today for its passage of the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act (S. 1171). Sponsored by Senators Jerry Moran (R-Kansas) and Angus King (I-Maine), this commonsense legislation will give veterinarians who treat their patients on the farm, in the wild, at a client’s home or in any other mobile setting, the ability to bring and use controlled substances to provide pain management, anesthesia or euthanasia.

“The Senate’s action proves that our nation’s leaders are listening to the veterinary profession and are diligently working to ensure that animals in all settings continue to receive the best quality care,” said Dr. Clark Fobian, president of the AVMA. “To be a veterinarian, you must be willing to go to your patients when they cannot come to you, and this means being able to bring all of the vital medications you need in your medical bag. We are pleased that the Senate has taken action to fix a loophole in federal regulation, which has concerned veterinarians over the past few years, and urge the U.S. House to swiftly follow suit.”

“The passage of the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act today is a step in the right direction for the licensed practitioners who help ensure public safety and care for animals in Kansas and across the country,” Sen. Moran said. “By legalizing the transportation and dispensation of controlled substances, this legislation makes certain veterinarians are equipped with the tools they need and is particularly important for practitioners who work in rural areas, conduct research or respond to emergency situations.”

“Iam very pleased the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act passed the Senate,” Sen. King said. “Working in a rural state like Maine often requires veterinarians to travel long distances in order to provide care to animals on farms, in homes and at shelters. This bill will grant properly licensed veterinarians the right to carry and administer controlled substances, including important medications, allowing them to do their jobs.”

Since November 2009, the Drug Enforcement Administration has informed the veterinary profession that the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) does not permit registrants to take controlled substances beyond their registered locations, such as a clinic or home in a veterinarian’s case. This narrow interpretation of the law is problematic for those veterinarians who care for animals in a variety of settings and also for those who live on a state border, therefore providing care in two states, but only having registered in one state. The DEA has indicated in the past that without a statutory change to the law, some veterinarians may be practicing outside the confines of the law.

AVMA’s Governmental Relations Division has been actively engaged with Capitol Hill staff to amend the CSA and has embarked in a year-long advocacy campaign to educate the public and the profession about how this regulation directly impacts veterinarians’ ability to protect the health and welfare of our nation’s animals.

AVMA’s members have sent more than 24,000 letters to Congress this year in support of the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act, and the bill has the support of more than 130 veterinary medical and other organizations. The House version of the bill (H.R. 1528) has more than 140 cosponsors and is endorsed by the House Veterinary Medicine Caucus, led by veterinarians Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) and Ted Yoho (R-Fla.).

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The AVMA, founded in 1863, is one of the oldest and largest veterinary medical organizations in the world, with more than 84,000 member veterinarians worldwide engaged in a wide variety of professional activities and dedicated to the art and science of veterinary medicine.

Dinosaur Digital LLC. Announces PooBagger

Press Release

Dinosaur Digital LLC.

Announcement

Eden Prairie, Minnesota — October 19, 2013 — PooBagger® is an easy-to-use apparatus for removing animal waste from your lawn and property. With the PooBagger®, you attach most any household plastic bag or common poo-bag, scoop up the waste, unsnap the bag into the trash. It is a durable, simple and economical solution to dispose of dog or cat waste, goose droppings or any other animal waste that might be preventing your property from being clean and safe.

Delivery and Availability

PooBagger® is available at PooBagger.com, retail pet supply stores and Pet Supply web sites.

PooBagger Spec’s

PooBagger® is molded of super-strong polymer composite material. Handle grip is made of high-density NPVC foam. Handle extension is black aluminum tubing with die-cast thread and composite plastic hand grip. PooBaggerRing® is made of poly vinyl chloride “PVC” for strength and spring shape memory. Simply snap bag into place with patented PooBaggerRing®, pick up waste and unsnap bag into trash container.

About Dinosaur Digital LLC.

Founded in 2012, Dinosaur Digital LLC. is the umbrella company of products designed to make processes more convenient and eco- friendly.



Eagles and Endangered Kirtland’s Warbler Among the Turbine’s Likely Casualties




(Washington, D.C., January 8, 2014) The Ohio National Guard facility at Camp Perry, near Port Clinton in northern Ohio, is the focus of possible legal action by American Bird Conservancy (ABC), a leading national bird conservation organization, and Ohio’s Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO), which today announced the intention to sue the Ohio National Guard in connection with violations of the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) and other federal laws concerning the planned installation of a wind turbine on the shores of Lake Erie.



The two groups announced their intention to sue via a letter sent by the Washington, D.C.-based public interest law firm of Meyer Glitzenstein & Crystal (MGC), stating that the environmental review process was unlawfully circumvented, and that the development is taking place in violation of the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act.



“The proposed development of wind power at Camp Perry ignores the many concerns expressed by wildlife professionals in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR),” said Dr. Michael Hutchins, National Coordinator of ABC’s Bird Smart Wind Energy Campaign. “If completed, this turbine would sit in the middle of a major bird migration corridor directly adjacent to a national wildlife refuge. The FWS has concluded it is likely to kill threatened and endangered bird species such as the Piping Plover and Kirtland’s Warbler, as well as other federally protected birds. We are asking the developer to immediately halt construction and take the steps mandated by federal law to prevent the illegal killing of protected species.”



ABC and BSBO consider the placement of the Camp Perry facility to present an extremely high risk to migrating songbirds, especially the federally endangered Kirtland’s Warbler. This imperiled species was nearly extinct less than 40 years ago and, while rebounding due to costly and intensive management efforts, still numbers only in the low thousands. Additional birds at risk include other migrating songbirds, raptors, Bald Eagles, and waterfowl.



According to Mark Shieldcastle, BSBO Research Director: “Long-term research indicates that some of the largest concentrations of migratory birds in North America occur in the Lake Erie coastal region, including Camp Perry. These species, along with one of the highest concentrations of nesting Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states, use the habitat precisely in the risk zone of turbines such as the one proposed. Long-term monitoring of the active eagle nest at the facility indicates extensive use of the area of the turbine by eagles.” Shieldcastle bases his statement on more than three decades of migratory bird research in the area, including as project leader for both wetland wildlife research and Bald Eagle recovery programs for the Ohio Division of Wildlife.




http://www.abcbirds.org/picts/newsandreports/camp_perry_map.jpg


Camp Perry, where wind development is currently progressing, is in the "red zone" of ABC's Wind Development Bird Risk Map, indicating an extreme risk to birds. The red area that crosses Lake Erie is a high-density migration corridor.


“The developers have misled the public about these federal and state concerns,” said Kimberly Kaufman, Director of the BSBO. “This project is the vanguard of a major planned build-out of wind power in what is one of the nation’s greatest songbird migration bottlenecks and a key site for birding and bird tourism. It potentially sets a horrific precedent.”



ABC has created a Wind Development Bird Risk Map that shows the Lake Erie shoreline in Ohio is among the worst possible locations for a wind power project. The configuration of water and land serves to “funnel” large numbers of protected migratory birds through a small area; the birds aim to avoid a long lake crossing by hugging the shoreline or following the shortest cross-water route to the Pelee Peninsula to the north. This is also major stopover habitat, where migrating birds are not merely flying over, but landing and taking off—often during poor weather conditions.



According to Kenn Kaufman, internationally acclaimed author of bird field guides and a local resident, “This funneling effect and stopover behavior can be predicted to put migrating birds precisely in the vicinity of the Camp Perry turbine and other wind energy sites proposed for the area.”



Those concerns have been echoed by FWS, which in a letter to Camp Perry cautioned that there is a high probability of bird mortality caused by turbine strikes from the project and called for a formal Endangered Species Act consultation. That request was ignored by Camp Perry officials. Further, the ODNR cited 23 significant areas of deficiency in the original Environmental Assessment. ODNR also specifically raised concerns about impacts to Kirtland’s Warbler and eagles.



“Unfortunately, the problems with this project suggest that the current voluntary federal guidelines aimed at minimizing impacts to migratory birds are flawed. If we cannot even trust the government’s own agencies to follow them, then it is time for a change to a mandatory permitting system,” noted Dr. Hutchins.



Also of concern to local residents and the birding community is the fact that the area hosts one of the largest birding events in the United States, helping to attract tens of thousands of people annually and injecting $37 million into the local economy.



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American Bird Conservancy (ABC) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit membership organization whose mission is to conserve native birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. ABC acts by safeguarding the rarest species, conserving and restoring habitats, and reducing threats, while building capacity in the bird conservation movement. www.abcbirds.org



Black Swamp Bird Observatory is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit whose mission is to inspire the appreciation, enjoyment, and conservation of birds and their habitats through research, education, and outreach. www.bsbobird.org


Wednesday, 08 January 2014 15:49

TICKETS NOW ON SALE FOR THE LUCKY ONES

 

 

 

 

 

 



ALEXANDRIA, VA – Tickets are now on sale for the premiere of the upcoming film The Lucky Ones.  The film, by Creative Liquid Productions in cooperation with Lucky Dog Animal Rescue, will premiere January 26, 2014 at 7:30 p.m. at the Arlington Cinema and Drafthouse.   Tickets are $10.00 and all box office proceeds will benefit Lucky Dog Animal Rescue.



The Lucky Ones follows the long journey many homeless animals must take to find their forever homes.  The film is a documentary about the animals and the tireless efforts of hundreds of volunteers who find these dogs homes.  The premiere will be hosted by Dr. Katy Nelson, host of “The Pet Show with Dr. Katy” on Washington DC’s news channel 8.

"This film is a must see for any animal lover," said Mirah Horowitz, founder and executive director of Lucky Dog Animal Rescue.  "To see the journey that each dog takes to find his or her forever home is truly amazing."

Creative Liquid’s team traveled to a shelter in Florence, SC to document rescue efforts by local volunteers. The production team also traveled to Puerto Rico to document the Island’s homeless dog problem and the unique efforts of rescuers to save these animals. One of the central characters in the film is a dog named Rico, who was plucked from the streets by rescuers. The film follows his journey back to health and his long trip to Washington, DC. Rico is one of the 6000 dogs that Lucky Dog has rescued since it was founded in 2009.



About Lucky Dog Animal Rescue

Lucky Dog Animal Rescue is non-profit animal rescue organization dedicated to saving the lives of homeless animals in high-kill shelters and educating the community on responsible pet ownership. Lucky Dog Animal Rescue relies on a network of volunteers and fosters to facilitate adoptions and provide temporary homes for the dogs and cats available for adoption. Most Lucky Dogs are rescued from high-kill shelters in Virginia, West Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Puerto Rico. Once rescued, the Lucky Dogs live in home through the Washington, DC metro area, including Maryland and Virginia. To learn more about Lucky Dog Animal Rescue and to view the animals awaiting their forever-homes, please visit http://www.luckydoganimalrescue.org.



About Creative Liquid Productions

Creative Liquid is a boutique production company based in Alexandria, VA specializing in high impact storytelling. Creative Liquid offers a full range of creative services from concept development to digital media distribution.  At the core, Creative Liquid is a team of media professionals looking to tell a good story.  Creative Liquid is a supporter and long term partner of Lucky Dog Animal Rescue.  For more information on Creative Liquid visit www.CreativeLiquid.com.     

Wednesday, 08 January 2014 14:59

Check out the latest from Mercy for Animals

Shockingly Standard
Garnering thousands of views in just days, MFA’s powerful new video exposes cruel practices that are considered standard and acceptable on today’s farms. Watch now.
Celebs Speak Out
Our undercover investigation into a DiGiorno Pizza cheese supplier had millions talking, including celebrities. Here are our favorite celebrity tweets. Check them out.
Cannibal Cows
A disturbing report revealed that farmers are feeding “poultry litter”—a disgusting muck that includes chicken feces and even pieces of ground beef—to cattle. Learn more.
River of Blood
A Texas meat packing facility has been accused of dumping gallons of pig’s blood into the Trinity River and tampering with evidence. Get all the details.
Awesome Archbishop
Known for championing the cause of the oppressed, Nobel Prize-winning archbishop Desmond Tutu is now speaking truth to power on behalf of animals. Read more.
Popular Pig
Our new favorite internet star is a Toronto-based pig named Esther. We interviewed Esther’s family and learned all about this sweet baby girl. Get the scoop.

MFA Volunteer Hits Major Milestone
Animal Products Among Strongest Links to Cancer
New Petition Aims to Create Federal Protections for Poultry
Good News: US Seafood Consumption on Steady Decline
'Compassion' T - Blue Chicken
'Free to Be' T

 

BETHESDA, MD—Alley Cat Allies, the nation’s largest advocacy group for cats, today reminds those who care for outdoor cats in their communities that a few simple steps can go a long way in keeping feral cats comfortable in freezing temperatures.

 

“Feral cats are hardy animals, well-adjusted to outdoor life, but as temperatures plummet, a few extra steps can ensure they stay warm and safe even in below-freezing temperatures,” says Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies.

 

To help the feral and stray cats in your community hunker down in the extreme cold, Alley Cat Allies suggests the following simple steps:

 

Provide an outdoor shelter and a refuge from cold and wind.

Shelters are easy and inexpensive to build. You can use the plans available at www.alleycat.org/WinterWeather—including a “5-minute shelter” made from a Styrofoam cooler. Some manufacturers sell pre-built cat shelters, but even a large plastic storage tub will work with simple modifications.

 

The shelter should be elevated off the ground and placed in a quiet area. The size of the shelter should depend on the number of cats in the colony. A good-sized shelter offers a space just big enough for three to five cats to huddle—but space should be limited if there is only one cat who needs shelter. The door should be no more than 6 to 8 inches wide to keep out bigger predators. A flap on the door will keep out snow, rain and wind.

Insulate the shelter against moisture as well as cold.

Straw (not hay—they are different!) resists the wet and keeps a shelter warm, and it is the best choice for insulation and bedding. Avoid blankets—they absorb moisture like a sponge.

If you have a shed or garage, allow cats to have access during winter and severe weather. But remove dangerous antifreeze products, which are lethal when consumed.

Provide fresh water daily and additional food.

In extremely cold weather, cats require larger food portions and fresh water twice a day to prevent dehydration. Wet food in insulated containers is ideal for wintertime, but extra dry food (which will not freeze) is also fine. Foam insulation can be applied to the hollow underside of a regular plastic feeding dish to slow the freezing of food and water.

Prevent dehydration by keeping water drinkable:

- Use bowls that are deep rather than wide, and place them in a sunny spot.

- And a pinch of sugar to the water; this keeps it from freezing as quickly and provides an energy boost for the cats!
- Purchase heated electric bowls (found in many pet shops).

Clear pathways.

Cats will find shelter, whether you build it for them or they find their own. But in heavy snowfall, it is important to clear snow away from entrances/exits of shelters so the cats don’t get “snowed in.”

Avoid salt and other melting products.

Alley Cat Allies does not recommend using salts or chemicals designed to melt snow near colonies. These products can be toxic and injure cats’ paws. There are specific “pet-safe” sidewalk melting salts available made of magnesium chloride, but it is still possible for cats to drink water out of melting puddles containing chemicals. We advise caregivers to be cautious if using these products.

Check your car before you drive.

Check under the car before starting it, as cats will sometimes crawl into the engine or hide underneath for warmth. Give the hood of your car a few taps, to scare out any cats who may be underneath and who you didn’t see. Remember that antifreeze is lethal to cats and other animals. Keep it out of reach!

 

More information about winter safety for outdoor cats can be found at www.alleycat.org/WinterWeather.

 

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About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than half a million supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of cats and kittens nationwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org.

 

Tuesday, 07 January 2014 15:01

Knight of the Dead

Inception Media Group Proudly Presents
Knight of the Dead